Jeffersonia

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Skulski wrote:

Wow, won't that be a show at your place!!
I will definitely do that.

My ultimate plan is to replace a major portion of my lawn with Jeffersonia; a Jeffersonian landscape (with both species) ;D
(and I'm not kidding!)

And you will invite us to the opening display, please? ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

My ultimate plan is to replace a major portion of my lawn with Jeffersonia; a Jeffersonian landscape (with both species) ;D
(and I'm not kidding!)

That might actually work well.  I have noted how massive Jeffersonia diphylla roots are compared to the plant, and I think they would be integral in keeping other weeds out. 

Both species had a great year last season for germination as unsown volunteers.

And it's a bummer when rain seems to always seems to be prevalent when my Jeffersonia bloom.  Although it is not detrimental on diphylla, rain makes blooming dubia unphotographic.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Seems you have a lot of seedlings you too, Rick!
BTW, I am sorry, Rick, but the blue Corydalis didn't set seeds. The pods were empty with just rudimentary seeds.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

I have noted how massive Jeffersonia diphylla roots are compared to the plant, and I think they would be integral in keeping other weeds out. 

Both species had a great year last season for germination as unsown volunteers.

And it's a bummer when rain seems to always seems to be prevalent when my Jeffersonia bloom.  Although it is not detrimental on diphylla, rain makes blooming dubia unphotographic.

Wow, look at all them baby plants, what's your plan for these?  Potting them up for your Chapter plant sales?  I do think it would only take a few years to convert one's lawn to a Jeffersonia meadow. ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Jeffersonia dubia with pods.  This year, with lots and lots of cool weather and rain, plants are fattening up and growing tall.  Jeffersonia dubia plants in flower give the impression of compact tuffets covered with bloom, but later on they can grow large; mine are about 16" (40 cm) tall and they start splaying sideways in all directions with the leaf canopy opening up, with a spread of up to 2' (60 cm).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting to see the full grown look.. Of course here, by the time they get to that point, it would probably be fall ;)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Can anyone spare some seed of Jeffersonia dubia?

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I've been watching the novel seed pods on Jeffersonia diphylla for nearly a month, waiting for them to ripen, as when they are ripe, they are suddenly so and quickly spill their bounty.  One can ever-so-gently squeeze the seem between the plump pipe-like base and the lid, to see if gives at all.  We had 5 days of rain, heavy at times, and this past Sunday I inspected the pods on the first sunny day since the rain, and nope... they were not ready yet.  

The following day when I got home from work, I checked, on some plants most of the pods already flipped-their-lids and spilled their load! :(  I collected what seed I could.  In the lower portion of my yard in deeper shade, the pods were still firm.  That was yesterday.  Today (tonight) when I checked those particular plants again, many pods had ruptured and spilled their contents, about half the pods flipped their lids but were still standing upright for easy collection, and just a few pods were still unopened but obviously ready... the seed all typically spills at about the same time, within a couple days.

They're attractive seeds, like small shiny popcorn kernels.  Notice that the pod on the right is a fused or double pod with back-to-back chambers and lids, although no party wall between the chambers.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Kinda like a double yoke, Mark.  :D

The last of my Jeffersonia diphylla pods began to open today.  I would have expected them to be later compare to yours, Mark, since your season starts so much earlier.  I did three protected, hand pollinated crosses of J. diphylla x J. dubia, and they all took.  Seeds look very healthy.  One pod did spill out before I got to it, but I think I salvaged about half of them.  None of my J. dubia x J. diphylla crosses were successful.  I'm not surprised: the weather was really crummy at the time.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nice plants, pods and seeds ;D ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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