Jeffersonia

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Woodard
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-11-29

I do have more photos of plants in Korea, both in cultivation and the wild. I'll make a few posts along those lines.

Trond, I know that the botanical garden is irrigated and watered regularly, and also the Korean peninsula is under the influence of summer monsoon, which means plenty of moisture during some of the hottest months. Presumably even when the plants' vegetative growth is dormant they benefit from not drying out completely. Other than that I don't know, but they are propagated from local/native stock so that probably helps too.

Mark, I only have J. diphylla at present, though it is certainly not because I don't want to grow J. dubia! It's just pure laziness or a lack of making it a priority. :-[  It's among several 'must haves' that I should make a priority very soon. J. diphylla grows near the garden naturally, and my plants are sourced from those colonies. I haven't given much attention to variation but will make a point to look closer next spring.

Joseph Woodard, just west of Nashville, TN. USDA zone 6b, but more like 7 or so in recent years.

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Stunning clumps of Jeffersonia everyone.  I grow both dubia and diphylla here, but haven't had the guts to try them out in the ground much yet as they're so rare here.  I've had a few flowers on the dubia and only a single flower so far on diphylla.  I hope to one day flower them well as a clump, but in my climate I think I am probably going to battle to do it.  Thank you all so much for the wonderful pics.

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

If anyone can spare some fresh seed of J. dubia, I would love to grow some.  Please send me a personal message.  Thanks.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gene wrote:

If anyone can spare some fresh seed of J. dubia, I would love to grow some.  Please send me a personal message.  Thanks.

Hi Gene, I'd be happy to send you some when they're ready.  The seed is ephemeral and should be sown shortly after the late spring harvest.  But if you depend on me remembering to send seed, it'll probably never happen, so feel free to send me a reminder message to me in late May to early June.  I also recommend putting your Jeffersonia dubia seed request in the Plant and Seed Swap topic, that way it won't be lost among a general topic :)
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?board=70.0

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Really nice looking plants! Not a genus I've seen much of--just the occasional mention on the forums, but after seeing Joseph's pics from Korea, I had to go back and look at the whole thread..
I'm curious to see which species Lori is growing?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Depending on one's taxonomic outlook, there are only two species, American J. dyphylla and Asian J. dubia.  However, the name of the Asian species was changed to the ugly name of Plagiorhegma dubium  (sounds like a skin disease), leaving Jeffersonia and Plagiorhegma each as monotypic genera.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

the name of the Asian species was changed to the ugly name of Plagiorhegma dubium

Not liking that. 

I guess that shows that our attempted (now generic) crosses all the less likely...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

McDonough wrote:

the name of the Asian species was changed to the ugly name of Plagiorhegma dubium

Not liking that. 

I guess that shows that our attempted (now generic) crosses all the less likely...

According to Darrell Probst, the cross between the two species if perfectly possible, and has been done, but I know of no particulars.  These plants may not care about the human-imposed nomenclature genus shift.  Time will tell ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

I'm curious to see which species Lori is growing?

I have a couple of Jeffersonia dubia but (the plant formerly known as  :rolleyes:) J. diphylla is also hardy here.  I thought I had acquired it once but it turned out I'd bought another J. dubia. (Doh!)

EDIT:  Ooops, I got that backwards... it's J. dubia that I will have to relabel in all my records!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

So, 2 more to add to the list then...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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