Iris 2011

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks, Luc! 
And I didn't know that was the norm for Juno iris:
that the standards grow below the falls. :)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Wish I could grow junos in my part of the world but alas, not even bucharica lasts more than 2-3 years.  I have to live vicariously through others.  Thankfully we can grow the reticulata with no fuss.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

LucS
LucS's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-12

You can find Iris (juno) aucheri with a whole range of blue flowers.
This clone has very dark blue flowers .

Torhout-Flanders-Belgium-zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wow, that's an intense dark color! :o :o :o  Truly special.

I have a single plant of I. aucheri (regular blue) growing outdoors for the past 8-9 years, flowering nicely the first few years but I only get leaves in more recent years, I don't think these plants take too kindly to competition from neighboring plants.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

LucS
LucS's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-12

Marc,
They need feeding in the growing season, especially potash after the flowering period.
Competition with other plants is not a good idea if you like flowers.

Torhout-Flanders-Belgium-zone 8a

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

My first two Junos of the season.

Iris tubergeniana, and
Iris bucharica 'Baldschuan Yellow'

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

LucS
LucS's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-12

A dwarf variety of Iris unguicularis ssp cretensis from Mt. Ida, Crete

Torhout-Flanders-Belgium-zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

LucS wrote:

A dwarf variety of Iris unguicularis ssp cretensis from Mt. Ida, Crete

Luc, that is totally charming and delightfully surprising!  :o :o
I love these dwarf grassy leaf types; didn't realize there was such dwarf form of I. unguicularis.  I had to google to find out there is a Mt. Ida in Crete as well as in Turkey (I'm familiar with some plants from the Turkish Mr. Ida); there are several other Mt. Ida locations too.

Googling I find this species offered by a number of UK nurseries.  Your plant looks more attractive than most photos I've found in my brief search, including on the Signa site:
http://www.signa.org/index.pl?Iris-cretensis
http://www.signa.org/index.pl?Display+Iris-cretensis+5

I found the species once listed on Plant Delights Nursery, listed as Zone 7, indicating it would not be hardy here.  A couple other sites rate it Zone 6.  Since it is a "winter grower", I'm figuring it would not grow here, although I have never tried.
http://www.plantdelights.com/Iris-unguicularis-ssp-cretensis-Perennial-W...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And there are those falling standards again, easily seen on the two yellow juno species.  Intriguing...

And interesting to know that I. unguicularis grows for you, Mark.  I don't know why, but I planted seeds of this one last year.  They germinated in late summer and they are in on the windowsill now.  (Sorry to say that they have been badly neglected, as I didn't think they would have a prayer here.)  Now maybe there is an eensy-teensy chance!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

And there are those falling standards again, easily seen on the two yellow juno species.  Intriguing...

And interesting to know that I. unguicularis grows for you, Mark.  I don't know why, but I planted seeds of this one last year.  They germinated in late summer and they are in on the windowsill now.  (Sorry to say that they have been badly neglected, as I didn't think they would have a prayer here.)  Now maybe there is an eensy-teensy chance!

Rick, sorry to have given the impression that I am growing this species; I'm not.  I always figured that being a winter grower/bloomer it would be much too tender for New England, and the zone ratings cited for the species are not encouraging.  Maybe the dwarf Cretan form would have greater hardiness?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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