Inside-out-flower: Vancouveria - my American dream!

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I would say it is a good time now as Vancouveria is best divided in spring ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Jan, I haven't worked with Vancouveria as much as Epimedium, but if the risk of any serious freezing temperature are over for you, then I would agree with Trond that dividing it now would most likely be successful.  Sending rhizomes that are ready to emerge would be easier than sending them later with fresh easily-damaged sprouts to worry about.

6 F here this morning, and only 13 F at near midday even though sunny, and with an snow/icepack layer still 18" deep, I'm afraid I will not see any Epimediums or Vancouverias for quite some time.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Some multimedia imagery on Vancouveria chrysantha!

Photo of Vancouveria chrysantha:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/papaquijote/94575538/
...with seed pods:
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0608+2034

Pollination:
Vancouveria chrysantha pollination by Bombus mixtus

Solitary bee visits Golden Inside-out flower


Seed dispersal:
Ants disperse seeds of Golden inside-out flower, Vancouveria chrysantha
(the ants are attracted to the elaiosome portion of the seed; the seed does look very much like Epimedium seed, like a tiny lima bean)

Ant disperse seeds of Vancouveria chrysantha

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A ray of sunshine today, a hairy coiled shoot on Vancouveria chrysantha.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Vancouveria chrysantha turned yellow early in summer 2011 and dropped all leaves, I worried that something happened.  Here in spring 2012, no sign of it, I think it gave up the ghost, in other words, it died.

I went down to my large patch of Vancouveria hexandra that has been in my dry unwatered woodland area for over two decades, dug out a piece to plant one closer to my cultivated garden area in proximity to Epimediums, but when I saw the very long rhizomes I had second thoughts.  I did indeed plant it, but in a spot that it will be free to run.  It should be noted that some Epimediums are equally spreading and sending out foot-long rhizomes annually, and such types must be planted carefully, versus the much better behaved clumping types.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Nice informative pics, Mark.  I haven't even noticed mine pop up yet!  Even the Hacquetia epipactis right next to it seems to do better (!) ???

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

ErnieC123
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-02

My Vancouveria chrsantha got little after the winter:-( So i decided to divide it. Just three divided plants left! Maybe this could help anyone.

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