An indispensible annual

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Is Bluecurls a different genus in Norway?  There are other genera that have these curled stamens and styles. I was googling, and it seems there is considerable variability among Trichostema dichotomum, depending on where it is found geographically.

No, we have no plants called Bluecurls/blåkrøller in Norway and Trichostema is not a native genus either although blue/blå is a very common part of plant names.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

McDonough wrote:

Is Bluecurls a different genus in Norway?  There are other genera that have these curled stamens and styles. I was googling, and it seems there is considerable variability among Trichostema dichotomum, depending on where it is found geographically.

No, we have no plants called Bluecurls/blåkrøller in Norway and Trichostema is not a native genus either although blue/blå is a very common part of plant names.

Trond, I misunderstood, when you said "Bluecurls (that's blåkrøller in Norw.) seems to be a loveable plant", I naturally assumed you have a plant in Norway called Bluecurls because you went to the trouble of providing a Norwegian name.  So, you're simply translating the word/name "bluecurls" as a language exercise, is that correct?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Trond, I misunderstood, when you said "Bluecurls (that's blåkrøller in Norw.) seems to be a loveable plant", I naturally assumed you have a plant in Norway called Bluecurls because you went to the trouble of providing a Norwegian name.  So, you're simply translating the word/name "bluecurls" as a language exercise, is that correct?

Yes, I forgot to tell that I translated the name. Think you can learn a little Norwegian! Or at least notice the similarities.....

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hendrix
Hendrix's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-12-24

Among my 1,000 perennial species are 3 or 4 annuals.  The one that never fails to grab the attention and interest of visitors to my experimental gardens is Felicia bergeriana 'Cub Scout' (Kingfisher Daisy).

This short, somewhat hairy species stands about 6 to 12 inches tall in bloom.  It is very easy to grow.  I start seeds indoors at 60 degrees F.  The seed germinates within 3 days!  About 4 weeks later, the plants begin blooming while still under my fluorescent lights.  I have tried this species in sun, shade, moist and dry and the preferred location is constantly moist to wet soil in full sun.  The flowers close at night or when in shade so a full-sun location is a must.  

You might look upon this species as "just another daisy" and, yes, it is a daisy -- a small daisy, at that.  It is its electric-blue color that is so eye-catching.  The color is similar to the intense blue of Eritrichium nanum (Alpine Forget-Me-Not).  The plants go into my garden in bloom in late May and continue to bloom until mid-October and are quite frost-hardy. Lots of viable seed is produced; however, the seed does not germinate in the open garden in my climate.

Jane Hendrix
Mountain View Experimental Gardens
Peak 7-Breckenridge, Colorado USA.
Elev: 10,000 feet
Zone 4
http://www.picturetrail.com/hendrix & http://www.picturetrail.com/snowtrekker7

 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Welcome to the forum, Jane!  So nice to have yet another learned grower here.

It's interesting that the Felicia bergeriana does not reseed in your garden, yet starts so easily indoors.  Any speculation as to why?  Do you use pasteurized soil (most people say "sterilized" soil) when you sow inside?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Jane
I see that Felicia bergeriana originates from southern Africa. I wonder if the seed losses viability under cold moist conditions.

Every year I add a few more native desert annuals in my garden. With the right spring moisture they add a boost of early color. I let them have their way in the walk ways and paths then take them out before they are all the way done blooming. I do let them set and released some replacement seed. I grow around seventeen species.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Weiser wrote:

Jane
I see that Felicia bergeriana originates from southern Africa. I wonder if the seed losses viability under cold moist conditions.

Every year I add a few more native desert annuals in my garden. With the right spring moisture they add a boost of early color. I let them have their way in the walk ways and paths then take them out before they are all the way done blooming. I do let them set and released some replacement seed. I grow around seventeen species.

John, of course you're going to show us some of those 17 desert annuals ;) 

I think this topic is a fascinating one, and the concept of growing annuals in a rock garden is too often overlooked or shunned, so I'm looking for more small annual species that will self-sow (within reason) to add to the garden milieu.  I haven't yet shown a small larkspur that a friend gave me (no name on it); I'm assuming it is an American species but could be wrong; it's a delightful long-blooming blue-purple flowered plant only reaching about 1 foot.  I only have a few bits of it around so far, but I did scatter the seed this summer in hope of more widespread appearances. 

And I'll be on the lookout for this Felicia, quite a nice little plant of such an excellent piercing blue.  Here are a couple more nice photo links I found:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Felicia_bergeriana_03.jpg
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Felicia_bergeriana_04.jpg

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Mark here is a start.

Blepharipappus scaber
Baileya multiradiata
Lasthenia chrysantha
Chaenactis douglasii var. douglasii
Psathyrotes annua
Layia glandulosa

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I love the Felicias! This looks like a great one...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Kingfisher daisy, Felicia bergeriana, used to be sold as a bedding plant here at one of the better local nurseries (that is, a plant sold at relatively low cost (plugs, usually) for seasonal usage)...  I used to buy them back in the days before I'd filled up the yard and still had use for bedding plants.  :rolleyes: 

I really like Baileya multiradiata too... reminds me of time spent in the Arizona desert.  Interesting that these are said to be annual, biennial or perennials at the USDA site - that seems to cover all the bases.  They didn't even reseed here for me though, unfortunately.  

The more common sort of tidy tips, Layia platyglossa (another California native), has established itself in our boulevard bed, from the neighbor's planting a few years ago.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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