Houstonia caerulea (Bluets) - a photographic essay

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Kuchel wrote:

Hi Mark,

I tried very unsuccessfully to post something here yesterday, but it did not work.  I wanted to show a Houstonia I had grown from seed and that is coming back again this spring.  I will have to work on using attachments.  Anyway Housonia is also growing wild here in Vermont.

Marianne
Fairlee, Vermont

Marianne, try the steps I mention in your other posting where you describe some difficulties uploading images, click this link to see my response:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=4.msg1151#msg1151

I'd very much like to see your Houstonia photo, so try the steps I describe, then report back with details about what the specific problems might be... let me know how far you get in the steps I describe.  Also, are you using a Mac or a PC?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have decided to try your Bluets once more if I find any for sale or seed. Does the Bluets come in bluer color? If I remember right those I have tried were bluer than shown in your pictures Mark, or does the pictures (or my screen) lie?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

I have decided to try your Bluets once more if I find any for sale or seed. Does the Bluets come in bluer color? If I remember right those I have tried were bluer than shown in your pictures Mark, or does the pictures (or my screen) lie?

Most often bluets are white lightly shaded with blue, although as you can see in the populations near me, there are pure whites, and some very pale blues too.  There are forms with much deeper blue color, but I don't have any of those yet, but I do want to get a good blue one day.  Check the link below for a good blue form.

Previously I posted the following link to a good blue-flowered form by SRGC member Helen Poirier, living in New Brunswick, Canada.
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4790.0;attach...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Yes! That is the color I remember of the plants I bought once. Thanks. I will try to get hold of different colors, maybe better chance for crossing and better viable seed.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kuchel
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-16

Hi Mark  --  Thanks for your help.  I will learn how to post pics eventually.  I am using a new Mac and I am having trouble changing from a PC.  My Houstonia photo will probably arrive when everyone stops talking about them.

Marianne

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Scanning through my digital photo library, I came upon two more photos of Houstonia caerulea in a rock garden setting, taken in a friend's garden, one is white and the other is light blue.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The abnormally hot weather and string of sunny days pushed things along faster than usual, and suddenly the Houstonia caerulea plants are starting into their main flush of flowering.

It is interesting that the winter-green bun turns out to be bluest form, whereas the winter red-leaf bun turns out to be white ever so slightly tinged blue.  The bluest one also has flowers 2-3 times larger than the others.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

The abnormally hot weather and string of sunny days pushed things along faster than usual, and suddenly the Houstonia caerulea plants are starting into their main flush of flowering.

It is interesting that the winter-green bun turns out to be bluest form, whereas the winter red-leaf bun turns out to be white ever so slightly tinged blue.  The bluest one also has flowers 2-3 times larger than the others.

We have the usual dull weather, neither hot nor cold, neither sun nor rain! The forecast  is more sun from today, but not high temperatures (about 10C at day and 4C at night).
Don't you think the whitest forms lack  pigments (carotenoids) in their leaves too? They have to compensate making anthocyanins instead.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

This shot taken specifically to show the degree of slope these are planted on.  I'm delighted, they have seeded around from last year's planting, and lots of babies coming up... they'll flower no matter how tiny a young plant they are.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Some more views as the plants are starting to "flower up a storm".  More and more single baby seedlings appear, each putting up a single sweet floret.  The eventually goal is to have bluets as an underplanting to my various Trillium species. 

An interesting phenomenon I have observed first hand, is the deepening of flower color, some that were basically white with the slightest hint of blue, have become decidedly blue.  Not sure if this is due to the weather, soil, or just a naturally occurring feature.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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