Help Me Identify This

15 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Peter wrote:

Here are the seedpods of the mystery plant.

Nice seedpods, like bright red beans.  Well, that rules out Hedysarum, no "loment" pods there.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'm inclined, from the seedpods, to guess astragalus rather than oxytropis, but there is a way to figure it out, if any flowers remain...

Peter, if you are willing and still able to find a flower, it could be examined (or photographed) to show the shape of the "keel", in order to distinguish whether it is an astragalus or an oxytropis.

The following photos of an oxytropis (O. viscida, I believe) show:

1) how the lower wings of the flower can be pulled apart to expose the central keel, which sits between the wings...    The dark pink prong that is visible in this photo is an example of the "pointed keel" that distinguishes oxytropis, while astragalus have a rounded or blunt keel.  (Unfortunately, I don't have an astragalus flower handy for comparison, but I'll try to remember to pick one tomorrow.)

2) Side view of dark pink pointed keel.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Doesn't the leaflets follow the keel? Blunt keel - blunt leaflets and vice versa.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I haven't heard that one, Trond, and I'd tend to think that it is not completely reliable, given the following example of Astragalus gilviflorus, which shows pointy leaflets:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Pages

Log in or register to post comments