Hellebores

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Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Mine are still frozen solid...no blooms until May.  I only have 7 selections so far but have 5 more on order for this spring.  I am starting to develop a love for them.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I just got my first two- from the plants that were on sale as florist plants at the supermarket- they are really no good as florist plants unless you can sell them fast! The creamy flowers quickly turned green, then the leaves started to yellow...lol So they were marked down sharply, and when I asked if they expected to be chucking them soon, they said probably and gave me two...lol.. they are starting new leaves, so hopefully are healthy- though there was a lot of water in the plastic pot covers (stinky!!!!) now I just have to keep them healthy indoors for the looooong time till I can put them outside....

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

AmyO
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

Cohan...Keep a close eye out for aphids!! The ones sold in bloom at supermarkets are so stressed they are aphid magnets!! :o

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

AmyO wrote:

Cohan...Keep a close eye out for aphids!! The ones sold in bloom at supermarkets are so stressed they are aphid magnets!! :o

I'll second that.  But aphids are easy to kill...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Helleborus niger is suddenly pushing forward withe buds expanding.  The form I grow is pink tinged when starting (now), aging to a strong pink color later on.

The plant always sets lots of seed, but no self-sown seedlings ever show up unless I give assistance, scratching in the seed when ripe.  When seed is sown "in situ", it germinates like weeds.  In the first photo, are clusters of 2-year seedlings, and the right-hand photo shows the first flowering from a 3-year old seedling.  In just several years scratching seed "in situ" I now have many hundreds of H. niger seedlings, probably too many, but an affordable and very doable way of increasing stock of one's plants.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

AmyO wrote:

Cohan...Keep a close eye out for aphids!! The ones sold in bloom at supermarkets are so stressed they are aphid magnets!! :o

I'll watch for that, thanks.. almost all of the old leaves are gone, just flower stems left.. I do agree with Rick though- as someone who has had to battle with mealybugs indoors for years, aphids are like a holiday...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And I hope you have cut the flower/seed pod off.  Otherwise you'll just be draining energy from the plant to the seeds that probably won't be "healthy" anyway.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Those rounded flowers are what the famous hellebore breeders like Helen Ballard and Elizabeth Strangman aimed for. They also crossed plants generally in the garden, rather than greenhouses, so as a result developed good garden strains - but it must have been freezing and hard work at times so early in the year! Elizabeth Strangman repeated pollination several times to ensure good results, and chose the warmest days. The plants were dotted about the nursery marked with different coloured wools. Somehow nice to see this with all the beds of plants for sale in between - harks back to the small individual specialist nurseries of old, which would be nice to see more of again. Must go out and get some pictures, but I haven't many as striking as Michael's.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

RickR wrote:

And I hope you have cut the flower/seed pod off.  Otherwise you'll just be draining energy from the plant to the seeds that probably won't be "healthy" anyway.

I'll take  a closer look, I don't think there is any seed forming, though I left the flower stems-- since the flowers have turned green, I assumed they are photosynthesizing!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Helleborus niger is suddenly pushing forward withe buds expanding.  The form I grow is pink tinged when starting (now), aging to a strong pink color later on.

The plant always sets lots of seed, but no self-sown seedlings ever show up unless I give assistance, scratching in the seed when ripe.  When seed is sown "in situ", it germinates like weeds.  In the first photo, are clusters of 2-year seedlings, and the right-hand photo shows the first flowering from a 3-year old seedling.  In just several years scratching seed "in situ" I now have many hundreds of H. niger seedlings, probably too many, but an affordable and very doable way of increasing stock of one's plants.

Mark it is a nice form you grow! If you ever get too many seed . . . . . .

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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