Hellebores

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Reed wrote:

McDonough,

No! these are from last winter I will take more this year in Dec. and Jan.. I have some amazing green ones and hopefully even some better ones this year. Like they say the grass is always greener on the other side I would love to be able to grow some of the plants you grow in situ. I can't stand most Rhododendron (I guess because I see them all the time) I enjoy the flowers in other peoples yards  ;D. Seattle is nice to visit but it rains more there even more than here and after living in Vegas for 6 years this is hard to get used to again.

Feel free to call me Mark (it's in my signature block :) )  One thing about the NARGS Forum is that the forum login names default to one's last name, so it is recommended to put your full name in your personal signature block, otherwise you might be addressed by last name only, if first name is unknown.

I believe all gardeners should have the experience of gardening in more than one place, it lends dimension to understanding climatic differences and the effect on plants.  Gardening in rainy Seattle was an experience to be sure, and while it had its highlights, and was a thorough learning experience, as a born New Englander it was a hard adjustment, and the one thing I missed the most was New England autumns, nothing like it, so I returned to my roots.  It must be quite an adjustment for you going from an arid environment like Vegas to the banana belt of the Pacific Northwest!  One great asset of the area, is that the rain and dampness can be escaped with a short 2 hour drive or so, to be within magnificent dryland and sagebrush areas, with a fabulously diverse flora.

Back to Hellebores, my garden is too wind-exposed in winter and sun-baked and dry in summer for most hellebores to prosper, they persist as mere pathetic shadows of themselves compared to more favorable climates, so I don't bother.  Although, I do like H. niger very much, and this one seems more amenable to our climate and makes a grand show each spring.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Reed
Reed's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-10-09

Thank you for the tip Mark. My name is James I will figure out all these buttons on here in time I guess.  :)

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Reed wrote:

Thank you for the tip Mark. My name is James I will figure out all these buttons on here in time I guess.  :)

Well, a belated Welcome To The NARGS Forum James!  If you have any questions about NARGS Forum and posting, feel free to ask.  By the way, I just noticed that your signature block states you are at 500' elevation.  I too am at 500' elevation, and I do think that gardening atop a hill has its own set of climatic concerns and issues.  On the good side here, we're in apple orchard country in this part of Massachusetts, the trees planted on hills to avoid the early frosts, so we do indeed miss the earliest frosts.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Feel free to call me Mark (it's in my signature block :) )  One thing about the NARGS Forum is that the forum login names default to one's last name, so it is recommended to put your full name in your personal signature block, otherwise you might be addressed by last name only, if first name is unknown.

Actually, you can change how your user name is listed on the forum, also.  That's what I did: I am "RickR" rather than "Rodich."

--------------------------------------------

And a very nice collection that you show here, James!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Reed
Reed's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-10-09

Thank you both! :) (I changed mine)

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

Woodard
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-11-29

James, those are all nice, and the first one is quite special. By chance are any from NWGN? I have a couple from there that are similar.

Here in Tennessee the season is getting underway a bit early. We've had virtually no cold weather so buds on some plants are far too advanced for this time. Some of the reproductive parts will inevitably be destroyed by cold later on.

One of my primary goals is to develop relatively compact plants with exceptional foliage, so I grow a range of species and hybrids from species. Among the best at this time of year are seedlings from H. bocconei, which unlike some other acaulescent species that also carry divided foliage, do not enter autumn-winter dormancy. The result is nice foliage year round for those in places with not-too-extreme winters.

Some images of autumn foliage.

Joseph Woodard, just west of Nashville, TN. USDA zone 6b, but more like 7 or so in recent years.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Joseph, the autumn foliage of your hellebores (bocconei seedlings?) are very handsome! I don't think I have anything similar. What do you call too-extreme-winters? (This November has been extreme here - the coldest in 140 years!)

James and/or Dave: How are your pretty hellebores doing now? Here the soil has frozen solid - no snow cover but cold as in a freezer. (The rest of Europe gets the snow.)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Woodard
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-11-29

Trond, I think it would be similar to H. orientalis and most others that are commonly grown: the tissues of leaves can be damaged in cold places that don't have winter snow cover (maybe USDA 5 and colder??). But this is also true of slightly warmer zones (6-7) during the coldest winters. Last year locally it reached 3 F (-16 C) with no problem to the long-term health of the plants. They're completely hardy.

Joseph Woodard, just west of Nashville, TN. USDA zone 6b, but more like 7 or so in recent years.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

OK, Joseph. In my garden the extreme cold hasn't been sub -10C/14F yet although other places it has been much colder. All Hellebores I have usually survive the winters untroubled. So they did last winter that was very cold too.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Welcome to the NARGS forum, Joseph!  It's great to have a hellebore expert here.  Love your website (hellebores.org), and that's a wonderful H. bocconei.

Sometimes an herbaceous hellebore is perfect for me with the unpredictable and cold winters here in Minnesota.  The foliage (while it is here) is always fresh...

Helleborus × purpurascens

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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