Hastings Scientific and Natural Area - Minnesota, USA

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

With a very wide aperture, I took a couple "artsy" pics....

                          

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, it still seems to be a very special place!

The woods there cannot be very old, the trees look young?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

You bring up an interesting query, Trond.  There are some trees at the top that are at least 50 years old, and a few fallen scattered rotted logs that look to have been much older, but your right, most of the "old" trees are in the 30-40 year range, I estimate.  Not sure why or how that is.  But next week I plan on seeing some old friends that have visited there for probably 50 years, and I'll see if I can get some background from them.

 

  I've often lusted at the growth you get in your lowland homestead, even that far north.  Everything seems to have a slower growth rate here in the Minnesota north.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am awaiting the answer regarding the age of the woods!

 

Regarding the growth here I think the climate is good for some plants - those which need humidity and benefit from the rain we usually have plenty of. The mild winters make possible an early spring but the cool weather does that growth is slow before warmer weather appear, usually in April/May. The long summer days are also beneficial.

However, a lot of plants which need really warm summers dislike the rather low summer temperatures here and die in the winter although they tolerate much colder winters where they come from!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Great posting Rick. Shows the special plants and topography of the area in beautiful detail. It is always very revealing to see how  plants such as Trillium nivale grow naturally.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Our Minnesota Chapter was fortunate to have Martin Wash give two presentations on May 3rd.  He has been on twelve expeditions to different parts of the Himalayas and is a wonderful speaker.  I jumped at the chance to be with him May 5th and showed him some wild areas here. Thanks to our unseasonably cold weather, the Snow trilliums were still blooming quite nicely.

                            

 

Asarum canadense doesn't escape deer browsing in the wild either, although it is minimal.

                           

 

Sangunaria canadensis

                           

 

Trillium cernuum with its bud starting to turn downward and Dicentra cucullaria

                          

 

Hepatica acutiloba

           

 

                          

 

There were a lot of them, as an example.....

                          

 

And has anyone ever seen this?  I've noticed it before (only once), but never realized it was actually part of a Hepatica plant.  The tall "dimorpic leaves" always seem to arise from a separate little stem at the crown, different from the normal leaves.  I can't seem to find any mention of it anywhere. 

           

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

. . . .

And has anyone ever seen this?  I've noticed it before (only once), but never realized it was actually part of a Hepatica plant.  The tall "dimorpic leaves" always seem to arise from a separate little stem at the crown, different from the normal leaves.  I can't seem to find any mention of it anywhere. 

           

[/quote]

 

I've seen something similar on Anemone nemorosa here and that's caused by a virus infection I think. But "your" leaves look healthy.

Coul'd also be a mutation of a flower bud producing real leaves in stead of the bracts (the bracts are I think botanically the same structure as the leaves of a wood anemone).

 

I like that wood very much! Wouldn't mind taking a walk there!

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'd love to walk there too... so different from the plants that occur here.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lori S. wrote:

I'd love to walk there too...

One can't just stroll around here.  In much of the area, and even on the not so steep parts, the choice plants are so dense that you have to watch where you place your feet with each step so as not to crush them.  Michelle, our current Chapter Chair came with Martin and me, and while we were busy photographing, she would stand in one place and study the view all around her, then move on to another stationary position.

A couple more pics I neglected to include:

Nasturtium officinale or N. microphyllum (I can't tell which). Watercress.  Tasty and very edible where the waters are clean, but this European plant isn't very welcome in our wilds.  It tends to clog streams and degrade the natural biodiversity.

                    

 

Hopefully, I'll get back to take a better look at those Hepatica leaf anomalies.  I normally would have studied them more, and hardly even realized that I didn't since Martin was with us.  I am still so tickled that I was able to spend so much time with him!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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