Garden Visits - what inspires you!

83 posts / 0 new
Last post
Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Oh that they were mine, Anne ... just random (but fine) examples from Blackpool Show 2010 ... but certainly representative of the quality to be seen at each of the Alpine Garden Society and Scottish Rock Garden Club national shows. Upwards of six or seven hundred plants at many of these events.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Three more images to inspire and titillate!

PRIMULA ALLIONII ANNA GRIFFITH
SAXIFRAGA KAREL CAPEK
CYCLAMEN COUM - THE FARRER MEDAL WINNING PLANT EXHIBITED BY MIKE AND CHRISTINE BROWN

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The plants are very fine, more like gems and jewelry than plants! I don't think I ever should manage to grow anything like that.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

The plants are very fine, more like gems and jewelry than plants! I don't think I ever should manage to grow anything like that.

I agree Trond.  And for most North Americans, such miraculous domes of impeccably well-flowered alpines are as far away as the UK plant shows themselves, because few gardeners here have greenhouses, let alone alpine houses, and there are no plant shows to aspire to.  Sure, local NARGS chapters might have a "plant show" at their meetings, but they're really just informal "show and tell" sessions.  For most North American rock gardeners, it's all about growing great plants in the ground and in troughs too, but outside and fully exposed to the elements; it is fair to say few will ever grow a pristine-domed impossibly dense-flowered Dionysia in their life time, it's just not in our vocabulary here, such visions remain floral eye-candy.

What inspires me is seeing plants in gardens that expand and surprise one's expectation.  I meant to follow up on this thread with several other garden visits, but the gardening season itself outpaced my intentions, so some of these will be posted in the gardening off-months.  One local garden astounded me, as it does anyone who visits, is the garden and nursery of Jan Sacks and Marty Schafer, well known Iris hybridizers; let me share a peak into the visit. I have always thought of Primula sieboldii as shade plants, and they seem reliable enough in such woodland situations, but Jan and Marty grow them in full sun, where they formed amazing broad swathes of flowering perfection.  Not only that, they're hybridizing this group of primula, and what I was seeing were their own seedling offspring, many unnamed, but some have been introduced brandishing fun names like "Smooch" and "Rock Candy".  Some varieties were growing in masses a meter wide in each direction, a sight to remember, an inspiration that is achievable.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Wonderful photos, Mark.  I'm wondering how Primula sieboldii would do in my developing water garden.  I could put it above the boggy areas but nothing in this garden gets totally dried out (except for a few spots this summer), and there's quite a bit of sun.  Primula japonica is trying to naturalize itself in the grass.  I love to get new ideas of things to try there.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Spiegel wrote:

Wonderful photos, Mark.  I'm wondering how Primula sieboldii would do in my developing water garden.  I could put it above the boggy areas but nothing in this garden gets totally dried out (except for a few spots this summer), and there's quite a bit of sun.  Primula japonica is trying to naturalize itself in the grass.  I love to get new ideas of things to try there.

From the photos you showed of your new water garden feature, I think Primula sieboldii would do just fine planted slightly upslope from the wetter boggy area, and should do well in sun.  In Jan & Marty's garden, they use a fairly generous layer of bark mulch, so I suggest doing the same.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Those swaths of P. sieboldii are magnificent!  What takes their place when they go into summer dormancy?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

P. sieboldi is on my list! I once grew it but it disappeared; don't know why, too dry maybe. Shouldn't think that happens here but it does, sometimes.
Lori, seems you'll get very cold weather the next week!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yes, we have been having rather cold weather!  Supposedly, it should get above zero by Thursday... we'll see.
http://www.nucleus.com/~silverview/weather/trends.htm

This is not an inspiring picture, but it is our backyard in the twilight at ~3:40 pm yesterday....

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Well, the solace is that the snowcover protects the plants against the cold!
And I think Friday will be a better day, with sun!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments