Fritillaria

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Some brooding images of Fritillaria unibracteata currently in bloom, a plant I received from my one and only order to Chen Yi years ago, and out of that order, THE ONLY plant actually correctly identified.  Based on my query on SRGC, I'm trusting Janis Ruksans' opinion that the plant is correctly identified.  http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=4972.msg151417#msg151417

This species seems reliable, very slow growing, stems to about 6-8" tall, enjoying life at the base of a shrub, thus mostly shaded.  The situation tends to be very dry in summer.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

Another view of Fritillaria eastwoodiae, on a fine sunny day, 6 years to flowers from a small bulb.

6 years?!?  Yikes, not for those who like instant gratification!  Alas, such a pretty thing though... (that I will therefore never see in my own garden.  ;D)

Another very interesting little frit, John.

F. unibracteata - what a colour!  After your drought, it seems it must be very tolerant of dry conditions indeed.

Representing the other end of the scale in fritillaria culture...  ;)
Tonight, I discovered one little F. michailovskyii that somehow survived from many years ago.  Thhey seemed to have died out, when I built a new bed and changed the drainage (or at least I thought that was why  ???).

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

McDonough wrote:

[What sort of conditions does F. atropurpurea enjoy? 

Mark I find it growing on the dry north facing steep slopes at lower elevations of 4,000'-6,000'. Higher up 6,000'-9,000' it can be found in sunny sights on gental slopes of clay or loam, with east or west exposures. The Key seems to be fine mineral soils that are venally moist but dry during summer dormancy. I think the lower elevation populations occur on the north slopes because they retain moisture for a longer period.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Some easy ones...  ;)
Fritillaria pallidiflora:

Fritillaria meleagris 'Alba', a twin!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Fritillaria camschatcensis - one is finally in bloom several eons after the bulbs were planted...
 

And whatever this is... F. pontica maybe, or what passes for it in the horticultural trade??  It has been identified as F. acmopetala, thanks to Maggi and Ian!  http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=7492.msg205856;boardseen#new

Does this mean my fritillaria jinx is over... ?   :o

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Skulski wrote:

Does this mean my fritillaria jinx is over... ?   :o

I'd say so, Lori.  Especially since the two you have need different care.  Your "whatever it is" one is especially nice!  My last F. camschatcensis finished blooming last week.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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