Fritillaria

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Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

Same plants today, approx. 2" high - 

                                

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

They've not been any worse at this stage ;-)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

These F. pudica from seed from Washington State. The leaves are very glaucous in a few of the plants, which unfortunately I haven't been able to reproduce in all their glory here. The flowers are very variable in shape and size. Each plant no more than 2" high.

        

                                                                           

 

The F. stenanthera ( Uzbekistan ) have enjoyed our mild winter too.

                                                                        

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

From Japan,  F.koidzumiana.

 

                 

                             

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Fermi
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Some great looking frits, Ron,

do you grow them under cover?

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Longma
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Fermi wrote:

......  do you grow them under cover?

devilindecision Such a simple question....... !!laugh

These days I grow many more species outdoor uncovered than undercover, but it is still very species dependent with me. I suspect that this bias will only increase in favour of uncovered in the future, wink

Those that are grown undercover are grown this way to prevent excessive moisture at various times of the year, as opposed to providing warmth. No artificial heat is ever given to the species grown undercover. I've never lost a species to freezing ( though some have been set back ), but have lost some to heat damage and having been too wet when warm also. If it's likely that the pot will freeze solid ( those in the ground in the garden find themselves a spot deep enough that they don't freeze! ) then material covers are used to prevent severe minus temperatures damaging the bulbs and roots. Once 'up' I've found that almost all species will be fine with short periods of below freezing air / soil surface temperatures.

Appearances can be deceptive and research is needed to understand the likely environmental experience of each species. The F. koidzumiana shown above are very tough, and have been growing uncovered all year for the last five years. Indeed a dry summer period would be lethal for this species. The F. pudica mostly seem to resent too much summer moisture, so are moved undercover during the summer period, to a cool dry area. I was always told that F. stenanthera and F. bucharica resent moisture. The F. stenanthera ( shown above ; taken inside for picturing and pollination ) and F. bucharica ( two weeks away from full flower ), have this year been uncovered all year and therefore subjected to constant soakings ( though very few minus temperatures ) since November 2013. I don't think they have ever grown so well for me!!  Can this be maintained for years to come, with different winter weather patterns? All I can say is that I am much more confident than I used to be, and no longer afraid to 'free' my plants to the elements. I'm more bothered about overheating and too moist warm conditions under glass, than cold outside for Fritillaria now. I'm beginning to suspect that some sort of gazebo / tent like construction will be much more useful to me than glasshouse and polytunnels are  enlightened If only their stability in high winds could be guaranteed !!

When seed is required some species are brought undercover to prevent damage and intrusion by ' alien' pollen. 

Sorry for my 'waffling' Fermi but this is still a complicated Genus to understand for me, and so far one that is difficult to summarize into a general answer, unless I say "some never, some partially, and some always". indecision

Do you grow all of your Fritillaria sp. uncovered?

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

From N. California this form of F. pudica reproduces itself prolifically, both vegetatively and by seed. Fully grown plants reach 6 to 8 inches high. Plants of this stature seem to be the most commonly found forms all down the West coast ( at least the majority of pictures people send me appear to be of forms like this ).

               

This very ground hugging form ( it will eventually grow to around 2" ) has been the exact opposite for me. I've had it growing for 8 years and it has stubbornly refused to increase. This year though it would seem there are a few more to keep it company. Commercial origin.

             

From N. Oregon these plants are the largest form I grow. The lower leaves can achieve 10" in length and some plants will be over 12" high. They seem to be very thirsty plants and are amongst the most tolerant of wet conditions

                

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

From near to Lake Van in Turkey, Fritillaria minuta. Uncovered.

                         

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Ron, been really enjoying the Frits, but F. minuta has my head spinning.  Back in the 1970s I had seed of it from the Macphail and Watson expedition, but did not have germination.

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Mark McD wrote:

Ron, been really enjoying the Frits, but F. minuta has my head spinning.  Back in the 1970s I had seed of it from the Macphail and Watson expedition, but did not have germination.

 

Maybe it's time to try again Mark? smiley I should get seed again this year, so will make sure some gets into the Seedex 2014.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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