Flowering now in the Southern Hemisphere

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Great exemplary photos of the frits, Dave!

They bunch you show is a nice array.

 

And although the erythronium subjects are very cool on their own, your photography shows them off in an fantastic fashion!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

More beautifully grown Fritillaria Dave. They really do well for you. 

The 'received as F. tenella ' looks good to me, although these days its more often called F. montana , with F. tenella as a synonym.

http://www.fritillariaicones.com/icones/ic600/Fritillaria_Icones613.pdf

F. tenella is also a synonym of F.orientalis according to Kew List. indecision  

I haven't changed the label on my plants yet either! smiley

Lovely F. messanensis Fermi. So many forms grown under this name, and you seem to have a good one there. smiley

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Thanks, Ron,

I must check with Marcus Harvey http://hillviewrareplants.com/  about its origin - I got it from him about 10 years! I'm not sure if he collected the seed himself as he does visit Greece and Turkey collecting seed. Which reminds me he must be due to send out a new seed list soon!cheeky

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

RickR wrote:

Great exemplary photos of the frits, Dave!

They bunch you show is a nice array.

 

And although the erythronium subjects are very cool on their own, your photography shows them off in an fantastic fashion!

Thanks a lot Rick

Here's another one you might like .

E.citrinum.

   

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Longma wrote:

More beautifully grown Fritillaria Dave. They really do well for you. 

The 'received as F. tenella ' looks good to me, although these days its more often called F. montana , with F. tenella as a synonym.

http://www.fritillariaicones.com/icones/ic600/Fritillaria_Icones613.pdf

F. tenella is also a synonym of F.orientalis according to Kew List. indecision  

I haven't changed the label on my plants yet either! smiley

Lovely F. messanensis Fermi. So many forms grown under this name, and you seem to have a good one there. smiley

Thanks for the comments and ID confirmation Ron

I'll leave it as F.tenella i think .Not enough hours in the day to keep up with all the name changes ........wink

 

Flowering in one of the troughs is one of the Synthyris species -a lovely little thing -maybe S.missurica .I'd grow it for the foliage alone.

The diminutive Primula clarkei - close up.

The unblemished blooms of Pleione alba 'cutie'.

Another Pleione ,(name forgotten sorry) ,growing outside year round in an unprotected trough.

Cheers Dave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Some real gems there Dave, but Synthyris missurica (mountain kittentails) is one that particularly resonates with me, not only for the good blue flowers, but as you say, for the excellent foliage.  Here's a link to a US Forest Service plant profile:

http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/synthyris_missurica.s...

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lots of pretties! Nice to see as we wind down ever closer to the big white...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Some Aussie native plants to show you:

Eremophila densifolia has deep purple flowers in terminal clusters - unlike most other emu-bushes

Eremophila densifoliaEremophila densifoliaEremophila densifolia

Leschenaultia biloba (light blue) is known as "wreath flower" in Western Australia because of its growth pattern, here's it's combined with a bright yellow Senna species which stays fairly prostrate (not sure if it is an Aussie but I've sent seed of it to the NARGS Seedex this year)

Leschenaultia&Senna

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

You know, Fermi, I had my Leschenaultia days, a short-lived phase where I bought seed from Australia and tried growing a number of wondrous Australian native plants, the intense blue on dwarf Leschenaultia shrubs beckoned big time.  I know there are other colors of Lesch. too, but I'm still intrigued with Australian flora, plants that I'll probably never be able to grow, now content just to look at them.  The Eremophila is attractive too.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Hi Mark,

funnily enough that's now my attitude to a lot of those lovely little woodlanders that I have no hope of growing in my climatelaugh

It did take a long time to achieve this attitude and it can easily be swayed by the thought of using the Shade house to protect them from our extreme heat (they still don't last long, though Mertensia virginica is holding on 3 years after I first got it!)

Another Aussie is this dwarf kangaroo paw, Anigozanthos "Bush gems series", in its second year - an achievement I feel as they often only last a season in our gardens - this one is planted in a raised bed with a small Senna artemesioides (and others);

Anigozanthos"Bush Gems"

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

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