Flowering now in the Southern Hemisphere

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Senecio 2
Senecio 2's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-01

What are you using for plunge material...

sphagnum moss?

I use wood shavings. They are good for insulation, lighter than sand, and if kept well soaked in summer they keep the root zone cool with the resultant evaporation.

Below Asphodelus acaulis, this has been flowering for weeks now.

North Canterbury

South Island, New Zealand

Elevation 11metres

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dave, some very nice bulbs you have!

Although I am not quite ready for winter yet, I already look forward to see my spring bulbs. In the meantime I can admire yours!

 

Senecio 2, Nice Asphodelus! I do grow a big white one but not this.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Hello all,

As odd as it may seem to all our Northern hemisphere friends spring is certainly on its way here. According to our local newspaper we have had the warmest July on record though some days have been quite cold.

I am not sure I can compete with Dave's and Stuart's horticultural efforts. Stuart in particular has been known to show the odd plant and win a few prizes at various  shows. However I will post a few pictures of shrubs flowering in my garden.

Camillia transnokoensis

Camillia transnokoensis   Camillia transnokoensis

Chaenomeles,red cultivar

Red Chaenomeles   Red Chaenomeles closeup   Red Chaenomeles

Kowhai (Sophora "Stuart's Gold") This is a New Zealand native There are 7 species and numerous selected varieties. In the last few days they have come into flower all over the city and look truly magnificent. This one is my own selection and I have named it after my great-uncle who promoted my early interest in New Zealand native plants

Sophora "Stuarts Gold"

 

Hazel catkins Those of you with sharp eyes may see a female flower above the right hand male catkins

Hazel catkins

 

Last, Southern rata (Metrosideros umbellata) This species is normally summer-flowering (December- January) but I found a plant that produced a few flowers in winter so I propagated it. As New Zealand is an island set in a large ocean the seasons as delineated in the northern hemisphere are do not follow in the same way here. Trees can flower sporadically at odd times of the year when conditions are favourable.

Metrosideros umbellata

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Dave, David and Stuart,

nice pics - we can't grow some of those things here - way too hot and dry!

Here are a few things in bloom this week.

Narcissus Thirty 'O; A dwarf shrub in a sand bed - An Aussie Native Plant, Pomaderris obcordata;

Retic Irises Harmony, Pauline, Cantab;

cheers

fermi

 

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Hi Fermi,

I like your little Pomaderris. It is a nice compact shrub. We have eight indigenous species one of which (Pomaderris phylicifolia) we share with you.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

David L wrote:

Hello all,

As odd as it may seem to all our Northern hemisphere friends spring is certainly on its way here. According to our local newspaper we have had the warmest July on record though some days have been quite cold.

We have had one of the warmest Julys too! A good 2C warmer than normal!

David, I have tried some NZ Sophora species without luck so far. Which one would you recommend in my climate? I have no hope in success with any Metrosideros though!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I like Pomaderris too but have no hope of growing any of the 70 species although an Australian tree, the Wollemi pine, has survived for 3 years now! It suffered badly in the last cold and dry winter.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Hoy wrote:

David, I have tried some NZ Sophora species without luck so far. Which one would you recommend in my climate? I have no hope in success with any Metrosideros though!

Hello Trond,

I am not entirely sure if Sophora would survive in your climate. However, you could try Sophora microphylla, the most wide-spread and hardy species. There are some provisos. It requires good fertile soils to grow well. It would not be happy on poorly-drained, low-nutrient acid soils. This species goes through an extended juvenile stage and may take 10 -15 years to flower. There is a lot of diversity in Sophora microphylla in terms of climatic adaptation, flowering times etc. Winter temperature would be the limiting factor (less then -5 degrees of frost). A lot of the forms sold commercially are the earlier maturing species ie Sophora tetraptera, Sophora molloyi ('Dragon's Gold'), Sophora howinsula ('Gnome') and are not as hardy.

Metrosideros umbellata (Southern rata) grows on the Auckland Islands (50 degrees 30 minutes south) so you could try that species as well.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Hoy wrote:

... an Australian tree, the Wollemi pine, has survived for 3 years now! It suffered badly in the last cold and dry winter.

Well, it has survived for a few million years apparently, so it's good to know you're helping to keep it alive, Trond!

Here are a few more pics:

Narcissus Jessamy and Lachenalia aloides in the garden;

Anemone coronaria - a little sweetie - ex Iraq via Goteborg;

Mixed Hybrid hoops - in the rock garden;

cheers

fermi

 

 

 

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Thanks Hoy .

Fermi some of your Narcissus are at the same stage as mine ie N. Jessamy. Nice looking Anemone by the way .

With your increased light levels you 'do' natives far better than I can David .

Here's a few more 'weeds'.

NARGS seedex sown 2009 .Crocus sieberii ssp atticus .I understand C.'Firefly' is a related cultivar however I think the species is more attractive .......

Just to prove i grow a few things other than bulbs ,(Smile),Hepatica nobilis ,deep pink, in one of the troughs..

I love the results you get when photographing Hellebores using the light to show up the subtle shadows over the partially overlapping petals.

The first of the various coloured Corydalis solida forms is well advanced.

 

It's just about Trillium time.Most have noses in various stages of growth.I counted 4 plants today where the buds are starting to open.Here's Trillium angustipetalum just waiting for a little more heat .

This plant was affected by a fungal attack last season and looked very sick.While it has improved a lot this year you can see a smaller white bud which in my experience might open to a deformed flower.

I 'nuked' all the plants a couple of weeks ago with 'Octave ' and will spray again in a few weeks .

Rightio that's enough from me tonight.

A big thank you to Lori for giving a brief explanation on another topic on how to use embedded images .

Cheers Dave.

 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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