Ferns

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I grow Dryopteris tokyoensis....
It hangs on (for ten years) in dry part shade among Sugar maple roots.  Never more than a foot high  :(.  I don't know if it is because it is too cold here in zone 4, or because of the clay based, rich, dry soil.

Adiantum venustum does quite well here, in the right places, of course.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Geoffrey, thanks for the positive ID on my Adiantum pedatum, nice to be sure about what it is. 

I have tried Athyrium 'Ghost' twice before, and each tim it "gave up the ghost" after just one season.  It should be hardy, but again, I think spring planting is probably better than autumn planting, for more established plants and better hardiness.

After a quick google search I found the Hardy Fern Library, an excellent resource! I have bookmarked it and will be studying and looking up the ferns that are being mentioned here.  Are there other fern web sites that fern newbies should know about?
http://hardyfernlibrary.com/ferns/home.cfm

Rick, I looked up Dryopteris tokyoensis, another new one for me.
http://hardyfernlibrary.com/ferns/listSpecies.cfm?Auto=39

I'd like to hear from any US nargs members regarding purchasing ferns, what mail order nurseries do you have experience with?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Hi Geoffrey, I am not sure which ferns i grow! I just buy those I like or sow spores and plant out everywhere I think they fit in! Maybe I should make an inventory of my ferns ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Geo F-W
Geo F-W's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-13

Well Rick, Dryopteris tokyoensis grows in wet and acidic soil in its natural habitat. Here she seems to be happy in my cool and neutral soil, and it's approximately 90cm (35 inches). So it is surely drought that blocks growth indeed.

Mark, I often planted in the fall here because the winters are never very strict (except there are about ten days here where the freezing weather has hit us ...), but the plants I really afraid of losing, I always plant in the spring. Plants are more established when winter comes.

Otherwise, in addition to the Hardy Fern Foundations, there is the American Fern Society ( http://amerfernsoc.org/ ) and the British Pteridological Society (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/bps/), and there are others.
I often look at these two blogs (http://varenplanten.blogspot.com/ and http://varenbos.blogspot.com/), a Dutch ferns-lover, which transforms a forest in southern France, in Ardèche, in a woodland of ferns.

Hoy, if you grow lots of ferns, it might be interesting to inventory them indeed! ^ ^ It could be funny!

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

Harold Peachey
Harold Peachey's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-22

Mark,
Two of the best sources for ferns are on the west coast, Sue Olsen http://www.foliagegardens.com/ and Judith the fern lady http://www.fancyfronds.com/list.cfm.  Fancy Fronds has a large selection of ferns hardy in our region.  I am growing Dropteris tokyoensis in my garden and Ellen Hornig had some magnificant specimens in her garden at Oswego.  You should be able to grow all the hardy Athyriums, spring planting is recommended.  Adiantum venustum grows like a week here, but Adiantum aleuticum subpumillum that I have started from spore struggles to barely survive, I keep trying possible sittings to encourage it.

Harold Peachey
USDA Z5, Onondaga, NY US

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks Geoffrey, regarding D. tokyoensis.  Unfortunately I hardly even have any constantly moist areas, let alone wet.  Oh well.  The maple was hit late in the year by a severe case of verticillium wilt, so maybe it will completely go...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Geo wrote:

Hoy, if you grow lots of ferns, it might be interesting to inventory them indeed! ^ ^ It could be funny!

Interesting to have it - not to do it ;)
In my work I have a lot of paper work - or laptop work these days so I try to avoid it in my spare time (forum time don't count  ;) )

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Jeddeloh
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-02

Geoffrey, that Adiantum pedatum "Japonicum" is stunning.  Any chance of spore next year?  Hint, Hint.  I even have an import permit and I've been fairly successful growing ferns from spore.  I use the peat pellet method because it's stupid simple.  It even seems to work for dryland ferns but you must transplant the prothallia early.  I start them all under lights inside.

Right now I've got at least half a dozen varieties coming from spore.  I'd post them but I have COL (cat on lap ) so I can't go down and check.  I know I have Woodwardia fimbriata, Polystichum vestitum, Doodia aspera at least to prothalia stage right now.  My greenhouse has Polypodium hesperium and Asplenum trichomanes plumosum coming along.  I also just repotted my Cyathea milnei babies.  Most of those are traveling north to the WWSW to be given to a friend who lives on the coast (mild enough to grow it) and Judith Jones.

Jan 

Jan Jeddeloh, Portland, Oregon, USA, Zone 8.  Rainy winters (40 inches or 1 meter) and pleasant dry summers which don't start until July most years!

Geo F-W
Geo F-W's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-13

Jan, here I use plastic mini-greenhouses and sowing on sterilized leaf mold. I would have tried with xerics ferns.
Yes, I suppose I should have spores of Adiantum aleuticum (pedatum) 'Japonicum', in truth, I've never tried to sow many Adiantum (Adiantum hispidulum this year, so far all goes well, the prothallia are there, still no initial frond).

I do not know, me neither, precisely the species that I sowed this year...There are some species I have sowed for the fun as Gleichenia quadripartita, Blechnum minus, Lastreopsis hispida, Blechnum niponicum etc..
Others are quite common, many different Asplenium scolopendrium, Asplenium x ebenoides, Dryopteris wallichiana, cycadina, crassirhizoma, odontoloma, Athyrium otophorum, Hypolepis glanduligera, Dryopteris coreano-montana, some Pteris (many form of P.cretica, umbrosa, wallichiana, vittata etc.) etc.
All are currently at the stage of prothalli, some first fronds begin to appear.
I had some problems in some mini-greenhouses with white rot...Hard to get contamination under control in a mini-greenhouse.

I'd love to plant Polystichum vestitum here, it's an absolutely beautiful fern, but I'm a little afraid of damages due to cold.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I must go to check my plant of Polystichum vestitum. Our climate is probably not much different to Geoffrey but the polystichum has probably not done so well because I have it in a place that is just too dry. I grow quite a few polystichums and find them generally very tolerant of our garden, and extremely attractive. One mountain species, stenophyllum, grows on a raised bed with alpines, and really makes me think I should try more such small species.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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