Fall Colour in the North

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Trond, I have never seen a Norway maple with any fall color other than yellow.  In my climate, usually they have very poor to not color change at all.  Actually, I am glad of that.  Homeowners here are always looking for non-yellow fall color trees, and I'd hate to see them start planting this one again.  It's quite a weedy tree here.

Well, yellow is maybe the commonest colour but some are yellow - orange or - red too. No need to plant Norway maple in USA, don't you have several native good-coloured maples?
We have in fact problem with the foreign but European species Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple) which is invasive and inferior regarding fall colour.

One of the best trees I've had is Parrotia persica. The fall colour was marvellous every year! Had to fell it though, it grew too big for the place I had it. (Picture from 2010).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That's too bad about the Parrotia, Trond.  The few people who have grown it in Minnesota have had very poor fall color results.  I grew one for several years (before it died) and it never got more than 1.5ft(.5m) high.  It was a select form with a wide chocolate border on the leaves similar to the Bandit epimedium but wider.  The color stayed the entire growing season and the plant was worth enough just for that.  The regular species parrotia survived only two summers before it croaked.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Today I tagged along with my sister and her husband and we visited my 101 year old aunt in Grand Rapids, Minnesota.  They own a crop dusting business and we flew up there in one of their non-crop dusting planes, so I took a few pics of a different kind of fall color.  Admittedly not so great photos, they were taken from the cockpit rather than through the better windows in the back.

We started in Hector, south central Minnesota, whic is the same latitude as Minneapolis.  This is part of the famous prairie pothole country, which throughout history has been integral for waterfowl migration.  This, also being part of the tall grass prairies where historic accounts have documented Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) growing so tall that one must be on horseback to see over the prairie "canopy".

This photo taken at an altitude of 5500ft.  The area is quite flat and all farmland.  The lightest colored areas are cornfields recently harvested, the light brown fields are corn ready to be harvested, and the two darker brown fields are kinds of soybeans. All fields are tiled for drainage, so it doesn't take much to imagine how rich and diverse these wetlands would have been an century or so ago. 
   

This second photo is near Grand Rapids, north central Minnesota.  This area is part of the Big woods biome transitioning into boreal forest.  Evidenced by the rugged lakeshores and islands, the terrain is not at all flat, but fairly rugged, although it doesn't look so much that way viewed from above.  Yellows are Quaking and Bigtooth Aspen (Populus tremuloides, P. grandidentata) and Paper birch (Betula papyrifera), reds and oranges mostly Red and Sugar maples (Acer rubrum, A. saccharum), dark green are conifers (White spruce, Red and White pines).  Don't let the cloud shadows fool you!
   

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

That's too bad about the Parrotia, Trond. 

It is amazing what one does for ones dearest ones, isn't it? (Did I put that wright ;D)
I think I had the species but it had a nice touch of colour all summer. I miss it!

It is a very special landscape you show us, Rick! Looks exiting. Can barely imagine how it was before it was cultivated :o

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting views, Rick!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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