Erythronium americanum - how to get it to flower

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Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I have grown Erythronium for twenty or more years at Denver Botanic Gardens where it blooms reliably: I have only one miserable picture to prove it...I have others I may locate sooner or later. It is actually one of the best Erythroniums I grow. It has spread to make quite a patch and comes up in the midst of other plants (like the Veronica armena and Pulsatilla in this picture). It is in a very rich peat bed with a north facing aspect but otherwise in full blasting Colorado sun.

I haven't had good luck with Erythronium americanum (full disclosure) although I recall spectacular woodlands full of it on the Cornell Campus in late April...I have been wanting to re create that some time!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Kelaidis wrote:

I have grown Erythronium for twenty or more years at Denver Botanic Gardens where it blooms reliably: I have only one miserable picture to prove it...I have others I may locate sooner or later. It is actually one of the best Erythroniums I grow. It has spread to make quite a patch and comes up in the midst of other plants (like the Veronica armena and Pulsatilla in this picture). It is in a very rich peat bed with a north facing aspect but otherwise in full blasting Colorado sun.

I haven't had good luck with Erythronium americanum (full disclosure) although I recall spectacular woodlands full of it on the Cornell Campus in late April...I have been wanting to re create that some time!

It seems they take sun but dislike competition from strong growing shrubs and trees. I have to remove some of mine, I think.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Those at our Botanical garden are growing in full morning sun but afternoon shade....any too themselves with no competition.  The soil is quite wet in fall-winter-spring and even in summer, never fully dries.  My shy bloomers at home are from a different source and have to fight it out with many neighbours.  The 'plants' don't mind...they have even spread happily into the lawn but flowers are scanty, although better blooming than 1%!  I have to get some of the strain from our BG as they are soooo free-flowering.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Todd wrote:

Those at our Botanical garden are growing in full morning sun but afternoon shade....any too themselves with no competition.  The soil is quite wet in fall-winter-spring and even in summer, never fully dries.  My shy bloomers at home are from a different source and have to fight it out with many neighbours.  The 'plants' don't mind...they have even spread happily into the lawn but flowers are scanty, although better blooming than 1%!  I have to get some of the strain from our BG as they are soooo free-flowering.

Todd, I've been sitting on the fence on this one, is there a cultural problem that inhibits flowering, or perhaps some forms are just better flowering than others.  Based on your comments, I'm going to side with the latter.  I'd be happy (maybe) with even the 1% blooming that you report, I've had my plants for about 10 years, and they have never flowered (0% flowering), but are spreading happily around.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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