Epimedium 2014

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Epimedium 2014

Kicking off this starter message on Epimedium 2014.  I hope to start into some research on new varieties available from a number of nurseries.  But for tonight, just a photo of a selected unnamed hybrid of mine that has deep chocolate foliage in spring, contrasting well with pure white flowers above the foliage.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Mark, this one has especially good qualities to show off the flowers!

 

Bravo!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Insprired by some superb images of lovely looking plants on this Forum last year, we purchased a small selection of Epimedium sp. and hybrids in the Fall. The first is flowering well now. Question is ..... what next? Do we need to do anything, or just leave them to their own devices to grow and grow ?

                

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

That's a very nice one Mark, why not name it "Chocolate and cream" wink

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Ron, glad you tried some Epimedium varieties, you can't go wrong with them.  They are "easy doers" and for the most part, very long lived, just leave them to their own and they will increase in size and loveliness each year.  I see you have E. x 'Black Sea' in bloom, one of the earliest blooming sorts, it's a sterile hybrid with E. pinnatum ssp. colchicum, best known for the very dark reddish or purplish black late autumn and winter foliage color.

Trond, I like the name "Chocolate and Cream" but this plant may not be good enough, the spring color is very good for just a short time, and then looks like many other epimediums, but its still in an "evaluation bed".

We still have a 1'-2' mantle of hard-pack snow, reached 52 F today so it felt like spring, but the next few days we're back into the frigid arctic blast. On the warm south side of my house, enough snow receded from a small strip of ground and suddenly out of nowhere there was a single bloom on Colchicum kesselringii.  The epimediums will surely be late this year, if ever spring actually arrives.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Thanks for the advice Mark, that's exactly what we'll do.

I can see a few more being added this year, laugh

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The first epimedium in flower this year. An unnamed plant with strange flowers (are they fully opened yet? Have to look again tomorrow.

   

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond, ot looks like it might be E. wushanense; the flowers are not quite open yet.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks Mark.

You are right, the flowers were more open today. I'll take a pic tomorrow.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

"Tomorrow" is more than a week later! The flowers opened properly some days ago.

Here are some pictures taken yesterday: (It's difficult to picture the flowers as they hang on the underside of the leaves)

 

 

 

The leaves are mottled in a nice way. Very different from the others (few) I have.

Pale yellow but quite large flowers.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

yup, that is E. wushanense.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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