Epimedium 2013

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gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

Thanks for your words about 'Harold epstein' and the species koreanum. Knowing this, it would be better for me not having bought this plant, but too late.  ;D
Do you mean that grandiflorum f. flavescens are all actually koreanum? for example 'La Rocaille?
I've not seen a koreanum before. It's a very rare species here. That's why I bought this 'Harold Epstein' at once.

During my visit to KVP there was in corner a box with hybrids. Huge flowering plants and Koen gave them away for almost nothing. I bought three.

Here are the pictures. First the whole plant and second the close-up.

My first impression is that of a wushanense habitus (is that a right word for performance?)
In photo 1 is maybe influence of E. amber queen.

gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

A few photos of Epimedium 'Sunshowers', a unique and beautiful epi originating from Far Reaches farm in Washington State; I got mine from Garden Vision a few years back.  Compact and floriferous, with specked foliage, and soft yet luminous yellow flowers and broad white sepals. It has a unique appearance on account of the nearly orbicular shape of the central cup on each floret.

E. 'Sunshowers'

That Epimdium 'Sunshowers' is a real stunner. Everything is okay. Speckled foliage, vigorous, and the attractive colour of the inflorescens.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wow Gerrit, you got three stunning epimediums for almost nothing, the first one is exceptional!

Regarding the nomenclature confusion around E. grandiflorum f. flavescens; according to William T. Stearn in his The Genus Epimedium published in 2002, E. grandiflorum f. flavescens is a recognized yellow-flowered phase of E. grandiflorum from Japan. However the name E. grandiflorum  ssp. koreanum is also seen a lot, to describe similar yellow-flowered plants from Korea, however that name was retired in 2002 when Stearn published the Korean plants as its own species E. koreanum, putting grandiflorum ssp. koreanum into synonymy.

In horticulture the two species are typically confused, both showing up under the old (now invalid) name of E. "grandiflorum ssp. koreanum".  Most plants in cultivation under the name E. grandiflorum ssp. koreanum or even E. koreanum, are in fact E. grandiflorum f. flavescens.  So the two correct names are:

E. grandiflorum f. flavescens
- a yellow flowered phase of typical grandiflorum, clump-forming non-running growth. Native to Japan.

E. koreanum (syn. grandiflorum ssp. koreanum), also yellow-flowered, but with running rhizomes extending 6-12" annually, native to N. Korea (where the "Type" was described, but also found in China)

In growth, it's not too hard to tell the plant apart, even without checking for the existence of long rhizomes in E. koreanum.  Epimedium koreanum doesn't make a tight multi-stemmed clump as is typical for E. grandiflorum, but appears as a colony of spaced-out vertical stems.  The photo below shows a form of E. koreanum that Garden Vision sells (their plants of several clones from N. Korea and some from China).  The naked stems stand nearly 2' tall, with a few yellow flowers under the canopy of unfurling leaves.  I planted mine in a rough woodsy spot where it can run.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I should've mentioned for Rick, and others in colder climates, E. koreanum is supposed to be very hardy and rated to as low as Zone 3.  Might be one to try, bearing in mind, its running-spreading growth.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Interesting picture of emerging E.koreanum.
Good to have a place for those interesting Epimediums in a wood. I don't have a woodland garden, but no complains.

Another 3 pictures of my new Epimediums, bought this weekend.

1.Epimedium grandiflorum 'Circe'
2 Epimedium campanulatum (expensive, even here) But a 'must-have'
3.Epimedium lishichenii Og 96024. The one with the registration cc 95007 was already here.
4.Epimedium lishichenii inflorescence

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I hate it when this happens; while I typically plant out individual Epimedium seedlings, I must have planted two seedlings together by mistake. Half of the clump (left side) has nice heart-shaped leaves and good leaf color, but small, uninteresting partially concealed white flowers, whereas the right side of the clump has bold clusters of pink-sepalled flowers with strong rosy-red cups.  I'm going to dig this clump up while in flower, wash off all soil, and attempt to separate them out, the white one to be discarded.

Oh, Gerrit, just noticed your photo additions to the message above.  It's good that grandiflorum 'Circe' has "jumped the pond" and made it to Europe, one of the very best deep-color grandiflorums, mine is just coming into bloom too.  I agree that Epimedium campanulatum is a "must have", I see buds on my two smallish plants... I had a rather large plant that died back to a smaller size plant a couple years ago, and my second plant is a flowering-size seedling that looks identical.  I am now of the opinion that E. lishihchenii is not entirely hardy here, I have lost the plant several times, the replacement I planted out last May is one of the few casualties over this past winter.  Even among a flat of E. lishihchenii seedlings, many did not return, which is too bad as its a beautiful species both for flower and foliage.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

The beauty of Epimediums.

Epimedium fargesi 'Pink Constellation'
Epimedium pinnatum ssp colchium

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Exquisite photographs, Gerrit, and exquisite subjects, too!

E. lishihchenii has been growing in my garden since 2005.  It seems hardy and doesn't get any special winter protection.  It increases slowly, and sometimes I wonder if flowers are somewhat deformed due to my cold climate (?).

   

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, you've done well with E. lishihchenii, I love the heavy textured foliage on this one.  I keep losing mine, and was coming to the conclusion it's not reliably hardy here! My replacement plant bought and planted out last spring, died over winter.  I wonder if there are different clones, some more hardy than others, or perhaps, mine were in too dry a spot.  I have a few seedlings coming along, one is in bloom, but even with the seedlings, about half of them died over winter.

Gerrit, a Rick says, really fine photos, getting the small narrow flowers of E. fargesii in focus is no easy task, such plants are devilishly difficult to photograph well.  I don't have Pink Constellation, just the regular species.

I've tried and tried to photograph an allied species, E. qingchengshanense over the last couple of bright sunny days, all photos were poor, so last night I photographed in low light, and finally got photos of the flowers in focus, but I don't like the low-light photos, but it'll have to do.

E. qingchengshanense, from Qing Cheng Shan, China.

Close-up of the flowers, comparing E. qingchengshanense with the similar E. fargesii flowers, the former having a better developed cup and yellow pollen as opposed to green.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

You did well, getting those difficult tiny flowers in focus. Now I know how the flowers of this Chinese-species-with-his-unpronounceable-name looks like. Something like fargesi or dolichostemon.

Well another difficult-to-get-in-focus-species is Epimedium x omeiense 'Stormcloud'. The first one coming into bloom from the x omeiense family, which I like so very much.

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