Epimedium 2013

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'm impressed by the huge flowers (relative to other Epimedium I have) on these plants this spring -
E. 'Harold Epstein' and E. grandiflorum 'Queen Esta':
 

I bought the first one as "E. grandiflorum v. koreanum" 'Harold Epstein'.  Would it actually be E. grandiflorum f. flavescens 'Harold Epstein' then?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, it seems like your repertoire of hardy Epimediums in Alberta is increasing!  Yes, Harold Epstein should be written as E. grandiflorum f. flavescens 'Harold Epstein'.  Is the selection of available Epimedium increasing in Canada, did you get your plants mail order?  I'm really interested in knowing how hardy Epimedium species/cultivars will be in colder climates, colder than my USDA Zone 5.  'Queen Esta' is a nice one too, great for spring foliage color.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

Epimedium mikinorii is another one at the end of the flowering season. Was not often to be seen here.
Difficult to take pictures. Each flower is looking its own different way. And they are hidden between the leaves. The flowers are  down with a long outer whitish sepal, almost covering the inner pink petal. The end of the spur is heading up. The rather big leaves are typical spined.

The two last pictures show an overall display, with the amber coloring of E. wushanense 'Caramel'.
Maybe there is a fine hybridization between those two.

gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

Probably the last flowering eppi of the season. But a real stunner. Extremely spiny flowers in red and copper tones. Top 5. Very small size and suitable for the rock garden.

Epimedium 'Spine Tingler'.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Trond, your plant is E. x versicolor 'Sulphureum', an old standby that has proven its garden value for a nearly a century.  I have this in a couple places, but my biggest patch is down at the lower wooded edge of my property, far out of reach of a hose, growing under dry dry dry Sugar Maples, and after 25 years neglected there, they still persist and grow and flower well.

This thread evolves fast! Can barely cope with the posts ;)
Thanks Mark. Make sense - I do remember the name when you tell me and not much has happened in this corner of the world regarding Epimediums for about 100 years.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Allison
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Joined: 2010-04-08

They seem to be getting more available here in Canada. I saw some at local nurseries, and Garden Import carries several in their mail order catalog. I just got two: E. youngianum Niveum and one just called 'Lilafee'. Those labels are less than informative, but such is marketing! 'Lilafee' is supposed to be only 6" high.

I've had three plants in my woodland garden for years now. One has pink and red flowers and leaves with a red edge in the spring, one has yellow flowers and the other has white ones, lots of them. The yellow one spreads like a mad fiend and is in my bad books for smothering some Trilliums but the others are great. Woodland gardens have a problem in that so many of the loveliest wildflowers go dormant early, leaving big gaps, and Epimediums seem like a great solution. Foliage with style!

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gerrit, 'Spine Tingler' is a wonderful plant, yet another one to add to my list of Epimedium to purchase.

Lis, your fiendishly spreading yellow Epimedium might be E. koreanum, does it have very large light-to-mid-green leaflets? Another yellow spreader (but much better behaved) is E. pinnatum ssp. colchicum or hybrids with it (E. x perralchicum 'Frohnleiten' or 'Wisley'). One thing I like about the Garden Vision Epimedium catalog by Karen Perkins, is that it identifies all Epimedium species and cultivars as to whether they are "clumpers" or "runners".  

I love your catch phrase for Epimedium, "foliage with style", couldn't be more true.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Allison
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

McDonough wrote:

.... fiendishly spreading yellow Epimedium might be E. koreanum, does it have very large light-to-mid-green leaflets? Another yellow spreader (but much better behaved) is E. pinnatum ssp. colchicum or hybrids with it (E. x perralchicum 'Frohnleiten' or 'Wisley')..

I wouldn't say the leaves were particularly large but they are a pale green. Given that I must have gotten it from a local nursery, it is likely a hybrid. Sorry but I  lost its label a long time ago. The flowers are pretty and come up very early, so it does have good points

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

The first time an Epimedium has flowered in our garden,  ;D. Was sold to us recently as Epimedium x 'Merlin'. Looking forward to seeing many many more in the years to come.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Congratulations Ron on your first Epimedium flowering, there's no turning back now ;D  It looks correct as 'Merlin', distinctive on account of the rounded inflated look to the cup. It's one of a couple dozen epimedium that I lost in our severe drought several years ago, need to replace this one.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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