Epimedium 2013

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

gerrit wrote:

Actually this was my second attempt, from a dozen pictures this one was okay,

And I have been doing this more and more, too, especially when laying on my stomach isn't an option in the middle of the garden!  I hold my camera near the ground and point at the subject and take a bunch of pics.

  One (or more) of them is bound to look good. ;D

Rick, I am not always that lucky! My new camera has too many options and I don't find the one I want when I need it! And the wind seems always to blow where I am trying to take a picture although it is totally quiet elsewhere :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Gerrit, although wushanense can't compete in flower power with some of the others you have shown, it looks interesting! How does it look from a little greater distance?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond - shouldn't be too hard for Ron (Longma) to find choice Epimedium in England, with the many find nurseries in the UK.

Gerrit, I don't remember Darrell Probst ever having a form of E. wushanense given as working name of 'nova', the term 'nova' is usually in conjunction with the syntax "PlantGenus sp. nova", indicating a new as-of-yet unpublished species for a given genus.  Darrell did introduce a dwarf extra spiny-leafed for of E. wushanense which was offered as E. wushanense "Spiny leaved forms", in other words, given a plant description versus a cultivar name.  Eventually, the plant was given a cultivar name by Tony Avent called E. wushanense 'Sandy Claws', a most regrettable name in opinion.

Ron, you asked for trade secrets on growing Epimedium.  Here are a few that come to mind.  Given them adequate space. They flourish with more light (sun) than shade in many cases; leaf coloring and flowering is best in a deciduous woodland that gets lots of sun when Epimedium are emerging and flowering.  While delicate looking, they do great in sun for at least a portion of the day, with foliage coloring best when there is sufficient sun. While fairly drought resistant, they do best with adequate moisture, the ones I have lost was due primarily to being stressed by drought.  They're not overly fussy about soil, but mixing in lots of decomposed bark mulch to a heavy soil works wonders and is much to their liking.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I have missed posting to these pages, will try and catch up.  Here's a selection of Epimedium photos taken this past weekend (May 18-19, 2013).

Probably the very best of Darrell Probst's epimedium hybrids is one called 'Pink Champagne'.  Mine is a young plant that's just getting going, but the plant form, speckled foliage, and strawberry pink flowers in above-the-foliage sprays make this a real winner.

Epimedium 'Lemon Zest' is yet another of Darrell's excellent hybrids, this one a vigorous hybrid of E. ecalcaratum, with many stems and innumerable yellow bells, with with a hint of vestigial spurs, a delightful long-flowering plant.

I often get colorful seedling-grown plants; here's one that has very bright foliage, worth growing just for the leaves.  This is a 3 year old plant from seed.

The next two show a selected hybrid of mine, between E. stellulatum and membranaceum, brilliant mottled foliage when first emerging then turning green, and airy sprays of white and yellow flowers that last until August.

Here's an odd one, E. x youngianum 'Sudama', a Japanese cultivar with curious small balloon-like red flowers that never open, and mostly concealed under the foliage.  However, the "foliage build" is excellent, with bronzy leaves amassed into a "table" of bright leaflets.

Epimedium grandiflorum 'Cranberry Sparkle' is a wild selection from high mountain location in Japan; rather late to emerge and late flowering, it has the closest to a true red flower of any Epimedium.  Another one introduced by Darrell Probst.

The small thimble-like yellow flowers of E. campanulatum are so cute, lacking any spurs, one of my favorites. In this vignette, we see three color forms of Iris cristata in the background.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

In this view are two angle showing E. grandiflorum var. coelestre 'Alpine Beauty'.  This variety represents one of the few truly alpine Epimedium, emerging later and flowering later than most grandiforum types.  The flowers are a soft palest cream yellow, but with such substance and extra wide sepals. The foliage is also dense growing and an apply green color; a very fine epimedium.  The cultivar named 'Alpine Beauty' is a selected form introduced by Darrell Probst.

These two photos show two hybrids grown from E. davidii EMR (the 3 letters represent a collector's initials).  The resulting hybrids are rather different as you can see. The one on the left has clouds of tiny yellow flowers with pink sepals.  The one of the right is a prize, extremely floriferous with large elegant bright yellow spider flowers.  My original E. davidii EMR is a slow weak grower, I'm lucky to get 20 flowers in a season, but this hybrid from it produces impressive swarms of bright bloom.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Gerrit, I don't remember Darrell Probst ever having a form of E. wushanense given as working name of 'nova', the term 'nova' is usually in conjunction with the syntax "PlantGenus sp. nova", indicating a new as-of-yet unpublished species.

While fairly drought resistant, they do best with adequate moisture, the ones I have lost was due primarily to being stressed by drought. 

Mark. I can't remember where I've got the story of wushanense nova. But true or not, it is plausible or perhaps likely.

About drought resistance: it's good to repeat this. Epimediums can suffer from drought indeed. And even pass away. Altough most of the nurseries regularly claim they are drought resist. In my garden I lost several species under an overhanging conifer. The Epimediums had to compete with the root system of this thirsty conifer. And they lost the unequal battle.

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Probably the very best of Darrell Probst's epimedium hybrids is one called 'Pink Champagne'.  Mine is a young plant that's just getting going, but the plant form, speckled foliage, and strawberry pink flowers in above-the-foliage sprays make this a real winner.

Epimedium 'Lemon Zest' is yet another of Darrell's excellent hybrids, this one a vigorous hybrid of E. ecalcaratum, with many stems and innumerable yellow bells, with with a hint of vestigial spurs, a delightful long-flowering plant.

The next two show a selected hybrid of mine, between E. stellulatum and membranaceum, brilliant mottled foliage when first emerging then turning green, and airy sprays of white and yellow flowers that last until August.

The small thimble-like yellow flowers of E. campanulatum are so cute, lacking any spurs, one of my favorites. In this vignette, we see three color forms of Iris cristata in the background.

Thanks a lot for the new information. Not a thing for the 'hurry-up' Face book page. We should reflect on this and read again and re-look the photos.

About 'Pink Champagne'. Now you may post pictures of this stunner without making me green of jealousy. At last I've got him. A very generous gift by Ben from 'The Houten Huys'.

You showed here the pictures of campanulatum and a hybrid of ecalcaratum. Two 'rare' growing species because of the shape of the flowers. The first I grow in the garden, the latter I 'forgot' to buy. Must do it as soon as possible.

This hybrid you showed, E. stellulatum x E. membranaceum must be a fantastic new cultivar, when it should get a name. Which such excellent parents.

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

McDonough wrote:

Ron, you asked for trade secrets on growing Epimedium.  Here are a few that come to mind.  Given them adequate space. They flourish with more light (sun) than shade in many cases; leaf coloring and flowering is best in a deciduous woodland that gets lots of sun when Epimedium are emerging and flowering.  While delicate looking, they do great in sun for at least a portion of the day, with foliage coloring best when there is sufficient sun. While fairly drought resistant, they do best with adequate moisture, the ones I have lost was due primarily to being stressed by drought.  They're not overly fussy about soil, but mixing in lots of decomposed bark mulch to a heavy soil works wonders and is much to their liking.

gerrit wrote:

About drought resistance: it's good to repeat this. Epimediums can suffer from drought indeed. And even pass away. Altough most of the nurseries regularly claim they are drought resist. In my garden I lost several species under an overhanging conifer. The Epimediums had to compete with the root system of this thirsty conifer. And they lost the unequal battle.

That's exactly what I wanted to know. Thanks Mark, and Gerrit  8)

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

gerrit
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

After having seen E. campanulatum and E. x ecalcaratum '...' with very special inflorescence, I show my Epimedium davidii with irregular formed petals. Each flower is different. And I'm fond of it.

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

The closest nursery to us has these for sale - Epimedium 'Black Sea' , Epimedium perralderianum and Epimedium x youngianum 'Shikinomai' .

We're thinking we should get one of each. Any comments on these three please?

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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