Epimedium 2013

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Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Mark,

Interesting to see those two side by side. I thought maybe someone was attempting to recognize some minor difference between populations. Qing Cheng Shan is on the opposite side (western) of the Sichuan basin from fargesii which is in the east around Chengkou. Both have their own suite of endemics it seems.

I also killed lishihchenii in Kansas and never rebought it. I have a few mystery "acuminatum" from Chen Yi ten years ago I should post soon.

Aaron

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gerrit, do you have a new camera? Your photos are showing some excellent detail. Seeing the E. x omeiense 'Stormcloud', I'm struck by two things, the first being the striking color (the obvious one), and the curious "hump-back" sepals, so distinctive!  I have only recently (last year) added E. x omeiense 'Akane' to my garden; the other named forms are on my list.  :)

Aaron, I only added E. dolichostemon to my garden a couple weeks ago from a mail order nursery, it would be great to include a flower from that species (next year), to show the differences in these three allied species.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

The season gets ahead of me so quickly, that I miss posting because the images are no longer timely.  But, I'm going to try and offer up some Epimedium images for you all.

Epimedium x youngianum-type hybrid that I nicknamed 'Bipolar' because most of the flowers have only 2 sepals like a propeller, although a few flower will have 3 or the normal 4 sepals. Floriferous, light pink, compact, a really nice little hybrid.

Epimedium x 'Black Sea', with light yellowish orange flowers on upright stems, beautiful near black autumn foliage.

Epimedium brevicornu, a younger plant than my big mature clump, airy sprays of white and yellow flowers in abundance.

Epimedium ilicifolium, in a state showing last year's base of evergreen foliage, and then the new orangish foliage and yellow buds forming.

Epimedium hybrid ([stellulatum x membranceum] x open-pollinated), second year seedling already flowering, with flurries of faint pink ascending sepals (they look white in the photo) and light yellow cups.

Epimedium pubigerum hybrid - three views of this lucky find, with very nice textured foliage, and sprays of light yellow flowers on shorter stems than normal, a 3-year seedling plant that I'm keeping an eye on.

E. x versicolor 'Cupreum', the foliage color is outlandish, such a deep orange-rust color with green veining, and coppery yellow & pink flowers.

One of my many hybrid seedlings involving E. grandiflorum 'Dark Beauty', with amazing deep reddish-coffee color foliage, worth growing just for the foliage alone.  The average mauve-ish blooms are mostly concealed by foliage (but, oh that foliage), but will probably hold off naming anything until I get one with foliage like this and great flowers too.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Epimedium ilicifolium, in a state showing last year's base of evergreen foliage, and then the new orangish foliage and yellow buds forming.

No Mark, no new camera. I'll try to show in my photos the beauty of the genus. No straight pictures, but a little more impressions, colour and light.

Epimedium ilicifolium, a beautiful species. typical spiny narrow leaves, the best part of the plant. Your plant Mark impressive by it's size. Good to see, the different orange colour.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gerrit, fine photo of E. ilicifolium. I have about 4 flats of seedlings coming along, very interested in seeing what the results might be, but first bloom will not be until at least another year.

After two days of much needed rain, I walked the garden briefly this morning before work, and snapped this photo of a hybrid epimedium in the foreground, selected on account of its floriferous habit and large pink and white flowers; not anything to get named, just to be enjoyed in my garden.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Yes Mark, I do the same thing in the morning. A stroll through my garden, looking if everything is going well and enjoy the fresh morning colours. The most happy moments of the day.

1. The reddish colour of Epimedium brachyrrhizum leaves hit my eyes.  
2 and 3: And once again, the clear red and yellow Epimedium x Yokiko.

The right name must be: Epimedium x 'Yokihi'

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

And I discovered a funny thing.
3 years ago I bought a too expensive Epimedium, a very small one, with one flower. A big flower, beautiful violet, Epimedium macrosepalum. The next years no flower(s) appeared and the plant did not increase.
And this morning it appeared to be a spreader without blooming.

The light green leaflets are from E. macrosepalum.
The specled ones, right of it are the leaves from E. wushanense 'Caramel'

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Epimedium 'Yokihi; is a real beauty, I received one a few weeks ago from a mail order nursery. Please note the spelling; on the Facebook Epimedium page there was discussion whether it is correctly 'Yokiho' or 'Yohiko', it can be found both ways, although it was verified that it is correctly E. 'Yokiho':
http://www.asianflora.com/Horticulture/epimedium-yohiki.htm

Your comment about E. macrosepalum being a "runner" caught my attention, as I haven't even considered it might be a runner, whenever I saw it at Garden Vision it's always been single plants (probably young plants that hadn't started running).  Today I was at Garden Vision and Karen Perkins has it noted right on the sign for this species, that it run. So, that means I will be relocating mine to spot where it can run freely. The flowers are totally hidden under the foliage, bur the sepals are indeed over-sized.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Epimedium 'Yokihi; is a real beauty, I received one a few weeks ago from a mail order nursery. Please note the spelling; on the Facebook Epimedium page there was discussion whether it is correctly 'Yokiho' or 'Yohiko', it can be found both ways, although it was verified that it is correctly E. 'Yokiho':
http://www.asianflora.com/Horticulture/epimedium-yohiki

I made a spelling mistake. It must be Epimedium x 'Yokihi'.

About the spelling of this red and yellow blooming hybrid, It's in the catalogue of Koen van Poucke, written like this 'Yokihi'. The same at PDN. So no 'Yokiho'. The burden of proof lies with others.
Maybe they are confused by the name of the new Epimedium stellulatum 'Yukiko, which I showed in reply 87. (Yokiko, the h and k are close)

About the parentage: There are some guesses about the parentage from photos (you mentioned it before) Well let it be. It's certainly difficult or impossible to determinate a well-known species from a picture. How can you be sure of the parents of a hybrid from a photo. Speculations.

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

In the 2012 catalogue of GVE the red and yellow hybrid is listed as Epimedium x Yohiki Cc 050030, E. daviddi x E. grandiflorum 'Yubae'.

Today I took pictures of Epimedium x omeiense 'Pale Fire Siblings'. Huge flowers under horizontal stems.

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