Epimedium 2011

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Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

Another nice small Epimedium, E. x youngianum 'Be My Valentine.' It's been in the garden for 3 years, originally purchased from Garden Visions. It's now about 1 foot across and is about 10 inches tall. The flowers are beautiful, and can be seen from quite a distance.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

More charming plants!
We have a lot of some kind(s) of tiny flying things which we might call gnats or 'no see 'ems' etc (in my house we say 'pinwall'(sp??) a word my housemate uses, not sure if it has any origin outside his mind or not..lol) thankfully, they do not bite, since they are here any time its above (or not far below!) freezing and too small to be stopped by the screens!
Meanwhile, we still have snow in some deep shade spots, and mosquitoes are already out!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Off topic but...
Here, or at least to me  ;), "gnats" are basically unidentifiable little flying objects, mostly harmless to plant and animal; often seen swarming later in summer in cyclonic clusters that I presume to be mating groups... ? 
Black flies are readily-identifiable blood-sucking pests with humped backs that spend their larval period attached to rocks in rivers, as Peter has described (and although I don't find the bites themselves painful, the itchy inflammation afterwards is maddening), and no-see-ums are... well, I actually have only encountered them in northern Saskatchewan and North Dakota (or something like them), not here, but they are miniscule biting flies with razor jaws.  Having said that, we only get some mosquitoes and a few black flies here... 
"No-see-um" netting has long been available as tent screening and works like a charm; perhaps it's available for windows too?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Both Epimedium brevicornu and E. x youngianum 'Be My Valentine' are among my favorite epimediums.  Be My Valentine does indeed stand out with rather perky bright color flowers, one of the best youngianum introductions,.

Wim: following up on your request, here is a photo showing the face-view of the flowers on "Mark's Star" ;D  Clean white inside.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I have lots and lots of hybrids from E. grandiflorum 'Dark Beauty'.  They are easy to spot, as they inherit the rich coffee-toffee-mocha foliage coloration.  Since these are bee hybrids, they hybridized with epimediums planted close by, such as E. grandiflorum 'Larchmont' (pale lavender and white), E. grandiforum f. flavescens 'La Rocaille', youngianum 'Liliputian', E. sempervirens, etc.  Observing these hybrid plants, one can see the potential if they were deliberately crossed with more colorful flowered species, otherwise, much of the resulting plants are rather bland so far as the flowers.

E. grandiflorum hybrid from 'Dark Beauty' with long narrow leaves (shows E. gr. f. flavescens influence):

E. grandiflorum hybrid from 'Dark Beauty' with rounded leaves, showing influence by E. sempervirens or E. x sasakii:

Other hybrids
Left:     hybrid with colorful foliage and cream flowers
Center: hybrid with red-brown-edged foliage and lavender flowers
Right:   hybrid with glossy burnished leaves and pale lavender flowers

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Skulski wrote:

  Having said that, we only get some mosquitoes and a few black flies here... 
"No-see-um" netting has long been available as tent screening and works like a charm; perhaps it's available for windows too?

Numerous kinds of flies here, but none of them biting fortunately :) Horseflies, but they rarely seem to get around to doing anything other than buzz around...
Worth looking into the no-see-um netting! I can wave them off, but some people are driven to distraction...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

For Gerrit, here are two views of E. grandiflorum 'Pierre's Purple'.  The foliage color and general look on many of these grandiflorums changes quickly, but this is a snapshot in time where there is both dark foliage and flowers, the foliage will lighten up quickly in the days to come.  The flowers are not so plentiful, nor are they anything special (not particularly purple either).

E. grandiflorum 'Pierre's Purple'

Next to it I have E. grandiflorum 'Mt. Kitadake Purple', which is later to leaf out and develop, nice flowers but again not floriferous thus not much of a show.  I could easily live without either of them.  Later in the summer I can tell the two apart by the way the leaves layer into dense leafy clumps, with new leaves showing some dark tones.

E. grandiflorum 'Mt. Kitadake Purple'

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Yes Mark, the short period of emerging with bronze foliage is the most lovely period of the epimedium-cycle. In my garden, with the flowering season almost done, there is definitely much to see. The  colourchanging of the second offspring of new leaves is interesting and every plant looks different and beautiful.

It's intriguing what you're gone do with those 120 hybrids underneath the Cornus Kousa. Normally one need days for labelling, digging and potting, registrating and so on. And that's only your bee- pollinated part. You did not tell us yet about your hybridization project from last year.

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Peter wrote:

Tomorrow starts the 3 day Epimedium extravaganza here in Central Massachusetts, as Garden Visions has its annual sale. Over the past few years I've brought home about a dozen Epimedium species and hybrids, but the one that I look for first when I go out to the garden is E. x versicolor 'Versicolor.' The leaves and the flowers look almost too perfectly matched, and it's grown to a very impressive size in 3 years. It's easily my favorite, and tomorrow I'll bring home at least one more of this beauty, plus a few more I've lusted after for years.

Hi Peter, how was your day at Garden Vision Epimedium? Did you bring back some cute little epimediums?
Your E x 'Be my Valentine' looks super as well as your E.brevicornu, who ought to be a slow growing specie.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

gerrit wrote:

Yes Mark...
It's intriguing what you're gone do with those 120 hybrids underneath the Cornus Kousa. Normally one need days for labelling, digging and potting, registrating and so on. And that's only your bee- pollinated part. You did not tell us yet about your hybridization project from last year.

The young plants under my Cornus kousa tree can stay there for up to 3 years before getting overcrowded.  This bed is currently a mix of 1, 2, and some 3-year plants... the older ones will be judged this season and moved out into the garden or marked for giveaway.

Left:  mixed 2-3 year hybrids; right: E. davidii EMR seedling... looking similar to the parent.

Seedlings, seedlings, seedlings, that will be the challenge this year.  Four flats of Epimedium on the left and center, 2 flats of Jeffersonia on the right.  I'm going to ask my wife to row-out some of the seedlings in a new bed.

Left: two views of a hybrid between E. x youngianum 'Freckles' x grandiflorum 'Princess Susan'; in one view the speckling can be seen better.  Has the clearer pink and white flowers of 'Princess Susan'.  Right: two views of E. gr. 'Princess Susan'.
 

Epimedium hybrid "Mark's Star" ;D (on the left) has a companion on the right, a hybrid of similar form and narrow pointy stars, in softest pale lilac.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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