Epimedium 2011

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wim, your season is closing so soon?  Of course, your season started much sooner than here.  I'm going to the open-nursery weekend at Garden Vision Epimediums (now at a new location, run by Karen), and I hope to pick up E. dolichostemon, yet another one on my wish list, I like the shape of the flowers.  Last year I finally moved my E. grandiflorum 'Yellow Princess', it has never performed well, probably too dry where I had it, and with the flowers I'm always hoping to see a brighter display, although it is a nice smaller-sized grandiflorum with flowers the color of forma flavescens forms.

I was looking around on the web and found this gallery of Epimediums, some of which I'm unfamiliar with:
http://www.visionspictures.com/index.php?module=result&searchKey=Barrenwort

Anyone familiar with the following cultivars:  Star Cloud (looks like an E. stellulatum cultivar), Madame Butterfly, Flowers of Sulphur (I know this one is going around in the UK and Europe, haven't seen it here in the USA yet), Egret (the one I like the most, beautiful white and yellow combination, elegant flower shape), and Big White (looks like a pale acuminatum type hybrid).

Direct links to two 'Egret' photos:
http://img.visionspictures.sodatech.com/ELBO/wprev/elbo54993.jpg
http://img.visionspictures.sodatech.com/ELBO/wprev/elbo54994.jpg

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Wim, your season is closing so soon?  Of course, your season started much sooner than here.  I'm going to the open-nursery weekend at Garden Vision Epimediums (now at a new location, run by Karen), and I hope to pick up E. dolichostemon, yet another one on my wish list, I like the shape of the flowers.  Last year I finally moved my E. grandiflorum 'Yellow Princess', it has never performed too well, probably too dry where I had it, and with the flowers I'm always hoping to see a brighter display, although it nice a nice smaller-sized grandiflorum with flowers the color of forma flavescens forms.

We have had a very warm and dry spring here in Belgium...so the flowers started early but most of them are going over now  :'( Still have the beautiful leaves for the rest of the year, though   :D

McDonough wrote:

I was looking around on the web and found this gallery of Epimediums, some of which I'm unfamiliar with:
http://www.visionspictures.com/index.php?module=result&searchKey=Barrenwort

Anyone familiar with the following cultivars:  Star Cloud (looks like an E. stellulatum cultivar), Madame Butterfly, Flowers of Sulphur (I know this one is going around in the UK and Europe, haven't seen it here in the USA yet), Egret (the one I like the most, beautiful white and yellow combination, elegant flower shape), and Big White (looks like a pale acuminatum type hybrid).

Direct links to two 'Egret' photos:
http://img.visionspictures.sodatech.com/ELBO/wprev/elbo54993.jpg
http://img.visionspictures.sodatech.com/ELBO/wprev/elbo54994.jpg

I've never heard of Star Cloud.
Madam Butterfly is a selection made by Robin White which gives a lot of flowers above the evergreen leaves...don't grow it myself but it has been for sale here in Belgium for a couple of years.
Flowers of Sulphur is a E.flavum x E. ogisui hybrid made by Robin White
Egret is one of the best spreaders, evergreen, carries it's large long-lasting flowers above the evergreen leaves, it's a E franchetii x E. latisepalum hybrid. If I remember correctly it's a hybrid made by Thierry Delabroye (His nursery is not far away from where I live, just across the border in France and he is very famous for his Helleborus crosses: http://www.mytho-fleurs.com/images/Delabroye/Hellebous-13-02-2005/page_0...).
Don't know Big White either.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

This weekend at Garden Vision Nursery their open weekend indeed. I received their catalogue and I wish I was there. So many desirable epimediums but also beautiful primulas. E.gr.'Pierres Purple, E.gr.Princess Susan' E.gr. Saxton's Purple' and so on.

Mark please show us pictures as many you can here.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

gerrit wrote:

This weekend at Garden Vision Nursery their open weekend indeed. I received their catalogue and I wish I was there. So many desirable epimediums but also beautiful primulas. E.gr.'Pierres Purple, E.gr.Princess Susan' E.gr. Saxton's Purple' and so on.

Mark please show us pictures as many you can here.

Gerrit, I tried to come home promptly tonight after work, with just a bit of light left, to take some photos, but only some came out okay, the low light is not the best for photography.  Epimedium grandiflorum 'Princess Susan' is one of the best, a clear pink and white that sets the standard buy which other clear bicolor epimedium flowers are judged. Yet another spontaneous hybrid in the garden of Harold Epstein, this one named for his daughter.  So far as purple grandiflorums go, 'Purple Prince' is by far the best and darkest purple.  The shots I took tonight do not do it justice.  'Pierre's Purple' and 'Saxton's Purple' are both nice, but frankly not as good as 'Purple Prince'.  I'll try and get shots on the weekend when I have sunlight.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Again, photographed in the warning light of dusk, these photos of Epimedium hybrids (2-4 year plants) should give some account of the anticipation of seeing hybrids bloom, to assess their potential... such fun, wish I could see them by daylight.

1-3: a bright cherry pink color with a white star on top of the sepals.  In the first view, some other hybrids blooming for the first time.

4:  my super-floriferous dwarf seedling from youngianum 'Liliputian'.
5:  a colorful 1st bloom on a seedling with bright spring foliage and largish lavender and white flowers.
6:  a dwarf hybrid seedling from 'Liluputian', with light pink and white flowers, odd recurved sepals, often just two sepals instead of four.

7-8: A sempervirens hybrid (possibly crossed with grandiflorum f. flavescens) with yellow and white flowers and light bronze foliage (foliage turns deep near-black in late fall).  Still in early flower.

9:   a small cherry color one, 2nd year seedling.
10: E. grandiflorum f. flavescens hybrid with very dense and rather huge cream flowers, lightly bronzed foliage.  Compact.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Wim's shot of E. dolichostemon is quite interesting as it shows the flower spurs as pinkish little curlicues.  A characteristic that might be interesting for breeding(?).

A few first flowers of Orangekönigin opened today in my garden, the first warm day we've had in weeks. (Yesterday was 30 degrees F below normal.)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I agree Rick, the flower shape on E. dolichostemon is truly unique.  The hybrid that Gerrit and Wim have shown before, E. x 'Amanogawa' has as one of its parents E. dolichostemon.  The form of E. dolichostemon that Garden Vision Epimediums sells has darker brownish-red spurs instead of pinkish ones, I suppose the plant is variable.

Included here are two shots of E. x warleyense 'Orangekönigin' that I happened to photograph tonight, for the purpose of noting the difference between it and regular warleyense.  I don't have side by side shots, but I noticed that 'Orangekönigin' has dark orange spur tips, whereas they are greenish-yellow in regular warleyense.  Flower color is a tad lighter orange with 'Orangekönigin' but I don't think I could tell the two apart on flower color alone, need to look at the spurs.  Also, 'Orangekönigin' has yellow pollen whereas regular warleyense has green pollen.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

It's wonderful, to go out in the garden in the early morning, as I do with my wife, who has become enthusiast of epimediums too, or as you do after a day of working with your photocamera and admire the new flowers blooming, or the appearency of new hybrids flowering for the first time.

That super-flowering x youngianum 'Liliputian' is really unbelievable. Compliments from my wife too.

I'm happy, I could purchase E.gr.'Purple Prince', you mentioned above.

One of the last flowering epimediums here in my garden, Epimedium wushanense nova. I'm real proud of it. An impressive appearance, altough it is a young plant, flowering for the first time.

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Impressive Epimedium displays!  Those at our BG are now even showing themselves yet.  I am just getting into these...recently purchased E. grandiflorum 'Saxton's Purple', E. wushanense and E. pubigenum 'Orangekinigin'.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

Tomorrow starts the 3 day Epimedium extravaganza here in Central Massachusetts, as Garden Visions has its annual sale. Over the past few years I've brought home about a dozen Epimedium species and hybrids, but the one that I look for first when I go out to the garden is E. x versicolor 'Versicolor.' The leaves and the flowers look almost too perfectly matched, and it's grown to a very impressive size in 3 years. It's easily my favorite, and tomorrow I'll bring home at least one more of this beauty, plus a few more I've lusted after for years.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

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