Epimedium 2011

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Lots of pretties! Some really great leaves and flowers..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hiya Gerrit, a nice one, showing E. grandiflorum 'Queen Esta'.  I have it planted very close to E. grandiflorum 'Dark Beauty', and it is very clear when comparing these two that they must be closely related, perhaps from the same cross. 'Dark Beauty' has more intense foliage coloration, but 'Queen Esta' is certainly desirable not only for the dark purplish leaf color in spring, but for the small leaflet size making for a handsome clump.  Another one, E. grandiflorum 'Pierre's Purple' must surely be yet another kindred cultivar, again with dark purplish tinged spring foliage and small leaflets and purplish flowers.  Here at least, these cultivars are relatively inexpensive and shouldn't be passed over for the more in-vogue cultivars, they're a relative bargain.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Catching up!

@Gerrit, I really like 'Night Mistress', such large and dramatic color flowers.  This is a Garden Vision Epimediums 2004 introduction from a wild-collected form (not a hybrid)  by Darrell Probst... I missed my chance at buying it; hasn't appeared in the catalog for years.  Darrell says it was collected at "high elevation locale near Nanchuan, China.

I see that 'Togan' and 'Freya' that Wim showed, are popular in Europe, but not available here that I'm aware of. :'(

Regarding E. davidii, I think two things are going on... Gerrit's photo show flowers at early stage, thus the spurs are not fully produced, and there are forms with rather short spurs.  I really like the "boxy" look to the flower, with well developed boxy cup, distinct from most any other epi.

The photo of E. grandiflorum 'White Queen' shows that we must not dismiss the older cultivars; this one is exceptional and very inexpensive as Epimedium go ($6), with lovely bronzed new growth and really dense sprays of white purple-tinged flowers.

@Wim - nice shot of E. x 'Amanogawa', one of my very favorites, apparently a hybrid of E. acuminatum x dolichostemon.  You captured the brownish yellow cup well, a most unique and desirable cultivar.  You mention one called 'Spine Tingler' (one of Darrell Probst's introductions), yet the photo is listed as 'Sphinx Twinkler'.  Is there really something called 'Sphinx Twinkler', or is the plant shown really 'Spine Tingler'?  The tiny-flowered white and yellow one that is listed as not-sasakii; it looks like one of the E. sagittatum types, of which there are many species that have these tiny white and yellow flowers.  Not sure what it is, but to be honest, I'm not overly fond of the E. sagittatum types... the flowers are just too small and insignificant, although the foliage can be nice.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Hiya Gerrit, a nice one, showing E. grandiflorum 'Queen Esta'.  I have it planted very close to E. grandiflorum 'Dark Beauty', and it is very clear when comparing these two that they must be closely related, perhaps from the same cross. 'Dark Beauty' has more intense foliage coloration, but 'Queen Esta' is certainly desirable not only for the dark purplish leaf color in spring, but for the small leaflet size making for a handsome clump.  Another one, E. grandiflorum 'Pierre's Purple' must surely be yet another kindred cultivar, again with dark purplish tinged spring foliage and small leaflets and purplish flowers.  Here at least, these cultivars are relatively inexpensive and shouldn't be passed over for the more in-vogue cultivars, they're a relative bargain.

Thank you Mark for your interesting expose about E. gr. 'Queen Esta'. The relation between 'Queen Esta' and 'Dark Beauty' is intriguing. Both are found in the garden of Herald Epstein, I presume. Can you tell us more about it? About parents? And...the more expensive ounces are not always the best. I think: The best the genus Epimedium can offers us, so far on, are 'Dark Beauty' and 'Queen Esta'. ('Dark Beauty and 'Pierre's Purple' are not available here in the low country's)

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

@Wim - nice shot of E. x 'Amanogawa', one of my very favorites, apparently a hybrid of E. acuminatum x dolichostemon.  You captured the brownish yellow cup well, a most unique and desirable cultivar.  You mention one called 'Spine Tingler' (one of Darrell Probst's introductions), yet the photo is listed as 'Sphinx Twinkler'.  Is there really something called 'Sphinx Twinkler', or is the plant shown really 'Spine Tingler'?  The tiny-flowered white and yellow one that is listed as not-sasakii; it looks like one of the E. sagittatum types, of which there are many species that have these tiny white and yellow flowers.  Not sure what it is, but to be honest, I'm not overly fond of the E. sagittatum types... the flowers are just too small and insignificant, although the foliage can be nice.

Mark,

there seems to have been a mix up with the name of 'Spine Tingler' here in Europe, a lot of breeders here sell E. 'Spine Tingler' as 'Sphinx Twinkler'  :-X but it's the same cultivar!

Like you said, the small flowered Epi has no flowers to write home about, but the leaves are nice.

gerrit wrote:

Thank you Mark for your interesting expose about E. gr. 'Queen Esta'. The relation between 'Queen Esta' and 'Dark Beauty' is intriguing. Both are found in the garden of Herald Epstein, I presume. Can you tell us more about it? About parents? And...the more expensive ounces are not always the best. I think: The best the genus Epimedium can offers us, so far on, are 'Dark Beauty' and 'Queen Esta'. ('Dark Beauty and 'Pierre's Purple' are not available here in the low country's)

I ordered 'Dark Beauty' last year from Probst, I hope to be able to show pictures next year. It is a cross between E. grandiflorum ‘Silver Queen’  and E. grandiflorum ‘Yubae’ found in the garden of H. Epstein. Maybe Mark can tell us more about the parentage of 'Queen Esta'.

And because I like this plant so much, here are some pics (again  :P) of E. 'Pink Champagne'

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Willis
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-12-11

McDonough wrote:

I really like 'Night Mistress', such large and dramatic color flowers.  This is a Garden Vision Epimediums 2004 introduction from a wild-collected form (not a hybrid)  by Darrell Probst... I missed my chance at buying it; hasn't appeared in the catalog for years.

Mark, just a heads-up that you haven't entirely missed your chance; the newly resurgent Collector's Nursery is offering 'Night Mistress' via mail-order:

http://www.collectorsnursery.com/cat03/index.php?main_page=product_info&...

I ordered one earlier this spring and now have a lovely 'Night Mistress' in hand.  (I also splurged on a E. wushanense 'Spiny Leaf Form' after seeing your spectacular pictures!)

eastern Massachusetts, z6

gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

A view on Epimedium x omeiense 'Akane' in my garden. Picture 1 and 2.

On picture 3 the same plant, but together with E. 'Amanogawa'. Two stunners in one view.

Number 4 "Amanogawa' in close-up.

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

From my garden, Epimedium 'Mikinorii'. Named after the famous Japanese planthunter Mikinori Ogisu.

It's a young plant, 2 years old and I'm not particular enthusiast about it. The flowers are hided behind large leaves. The two toned flowers are okay.

Mark, I like to hear your opinion about this plant. You never discussed it on a one of the fora you participate, as far as I know. And I like to know wheather it is a spreader or a clumper.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

WimB wrote:

there seems to have been a mix up with the name of 'Spine Tingler' here in Europe, a lot of breeders here sell E. 'Spine Tingler' as 'Sphinx Twinkler'  :-X but it's the same cultivar!

gerrit wrote:

Thank you Mark for your interesting expose about E. gr. 'Queen Esta'. The relation between 'Queen Esta' and 'Dark Beauty' is intriguing. Both are found in the garden of Herald Epstein, I presume. Can you tell us more about it? About parents?  I think: The best the genus Epimedium can offers us, so far on, are 'Dark Beauty' and 'Queen Esta'. ('Dark Beauty and 'Pierre's Purple' are not available here in the low country's)

I ordered 'Dark Beauty' last year from Probst, I hope to be able to show pictures next year. It is a cross between E. grandiflorum ‘Silver Queen’  and E. grandiflorum ‘Yubae’ found in the garden of H. Epstein. Maybe Mark can tell us more about the parentage of 'Queen Esta'.

Wim, that mixup between the correct name 'Spine Tingler' somehow becoming 'Sphinx Twinkler' :rolleyes:, reminds me of the game where a group of people form a circle, one person wispers a phrase in their neighbor's ear, who turns around and wispers what they heard in their neighbor's ear, and by the time it goes around the circle it comes out as something completely different.  Seems like someone tried interpreting some bad handwriting on a label; the genesis of name confusion... 40 years from now Epimedium aficionados will struggle to learn the true origins of such plants, if this name mistake continues to spread.

Wim and Gerrit:  The Garden Vision Epimediums catalog says about E. grandiflorum 'Queen Esta': "a beautiful cultivar named by Harold Epstein after his wife, Esta. It was the first named seedling introduced from his garden".  The parentage of 'Dark Beauty' is stated as an apparent cross between 'Yubae' and 'Silver Queen' (yet another spontaneous hybrid seedling in Harold Epstein's garden),although this doesn't seem entirely clear to me, there are other possibilities of species and cultivars that seem more likely to pass along dark foliage color.  

Much more likely as one of the parents would be E. grandiflorum var. violaceum, which when first emerging has dramatically dark foliage which can take on various hues depending on exposure and as days go by.  Other cultivars like E. grandiflorum 'Tama Mo Genpei' and E. g. var. violaceum 'Bronze Maiden' also have striking dark foliage.  Then there are various youngianum and even some sempervirens that are very dark leaved, which when they cross with grandiflorum, do not always seem obvious as a cross... many so-called grandiflorum and even some youngianum are actually mixed heritage.  Here are some photos of dark-foliaged types to give an idea of their similarity.

Early leaf emergence:
left:  E. grandiflorum 'Dark Beauty', center: E. grandiflorum 'Queen Esta', right: E. grandiflorum var. violaceum

More developed leaves:
left:  E. grandiflorum 'Dark Beauty', center: E. grandiflorum 'Queen Esta', right: E. grandiforum var. violaceum
As can be seen in the side-by-side comparison of 'Dark Beauty' and 'Queen Esta', they are very similar.  As I stated before, I think 'Dark Beauty' is the better of the two.  'Queen Esta' is a bit more upright growing (less spreading) and has smaller more pointed leaflets, and foliage color that is more somber toned and lacking the rich coffee tones taken on by 'dark Beauty'.

E. grandiforum 'Tama No Genpei':

Left and right: E. grandiflorum var. violaceum 'Bronze Maiden':

Hybrid seedling of E. sempervirens 'Aurora', with very dark leaves:

PS:  Loved the pics of E. 'Pink Champagne', one can never has too much champagne ;)  Mine is budded and should be photogenic by next weekend.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

macjon wrote:

Mark, just a heads-up that you haven't entirely missed your chance; the newly resurgent Collector's Nursery is offering 'Night Mistress' via mail-order:
http://www.collectorsnursery.com/cat03/index.php?main_page=product_info&...
I ordered one earlier this spring and now have a lovely 'Night Mistress' in hand.  (I also splurged on a E. wushanense 'Spiny Leaf Form' after seeing your spectacular pictures!)

Thanks Macjon, I wasn't aware that Collector's Nursery started back up again, even if just in a small way, I used to order from them.  So far as ordering plants, I think I'll still have to "cool my heels" and hold back on much spending, as with my new job I took a 34% cut in pay, gas prices are crazy with my long daily commute, and next year is a "double-up college year" where I will have both of my girls in college next year, so will have extra financial concerns.  But I think I do need this 'Night Mistress' ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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