Echinocereus knippelianus var. kruegeri

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penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Also, here's a shot of the Opuntia basilaris I mentioned a while ago. Not sure if it's completely in focus, but I don't feel like getting very close to it. It's shriveling, which is a good sign. I guess. I'm kind of scared of it.
And a mystery cactus. It was labeled "Tephrocactus sp.", but I've never been able to match it to any description of anything. It's completely filled this pan over the last 20 years or so, and has rarely flowered (maybe never).

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Bob
You have every right to be fearful of the basilaris.  :'( Not fun when they shed their on you and I can attest to it!! :o

Interesting that you can grow a Tephrocactus. I have tried a couple and turned them into mush, with no effort on my part.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

Bob I dont think your dead glomerata was a glomerata. Maybe a cumulopuntia. Any pictures in the alive state? That would also explain the lack of hardiness. I have around 50 clones of Maihueniopsis that seem at least cold hardy here when dry.
The Tephrocactus mentioned later is not such one. Looks more like an Opuntia. Any pictures in flower?

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

The Tephrocactus mentioned later is not such one. Looks more like an Opuntia. Any pictures in flower? 

I agree; it doesn't match the descriptions of any tephrocactus anywhere I've looked. No flowers. It creeps on the ground. The joints do not detach readily as in Opuntia fragilis, and the pads only grow upright where there is no room to grow flat on the ground.
I spend a lot of time trying to key it out and then give up.
The Maihueniopsis glomerata came from Mesa Garden, 551.9298. This plant is frost-tender, obviously.

I don't know very much about South American cacti, except what I've read.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Manfroni
Manfroni's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-06-02

I found a pink form of Echinocereus knippelianus on eBay and I could not resist from buying it! On Dave's Garden it says they are hard to 25F. I guess I will cover it in a cloche next winter if it gets colder than that!

Rino, zone 7/8a Dallas TX, rainfall 38 inch or 1 meter per year (highest rainfall in May with 5.29in/134mm, March with 4.34in/110mm and October with 4.21in/107mm), mild winters with 1-2 days of snow (Record low -1F/-18C) and hot, semi-humid summers (Reco

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting to see how hardy some of these are- many of these are plants I know, but which (apart from obvious places like Arizona, California and Florida) I have only known as house/greenhouse plants (by far the bigger part of my cactus knowledge, both personal and from various groups)..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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