Early native alpines in Newfoundland

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Todd wrote:

Rick, we call all stunted conifers 'tuckamore'...essentially a local name which means the same as 'krumholtz' in Europe.

We don't say krumholtz in all Europe! It is a German word (from Switzerland maybe). Actually we don't have a similar word in Norwegian (not that I know of) but use different adjectives to describe the trees or bushes.
Very nice pictures Todd! Some plants I recognize from here, others are new to me. Do you eat the cloudberry? Here it is a very popular berry and often used for jam.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Quote:

Do you eat the cloudberry? Here it is a very popular berry and often used for jam.

Oh, dear, you had to mention that just when I'm feeling hungry..... ;) Cloudberry jam is WONDERFUL!! Just don't have enough friends coming backwards and forwards from Scandanavia to bring it here! I must try and find an internet source ...... :D

M

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

IMYoung wrote:

Oh, dear, you had to mention that just when I'm feeling hungry..... ;) Cloudberry jam is WONDERFUL!! Just don't have enough friends coming backwards and forwards from Scandanavia to bring it here! I must try and find an internet source ...... :D

M

You can come and pick for yourself! August is fine.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Hoy wrote:

IMYoung wrote:

Oh, dear, you had to mention that just when I'm feeling hungry..... ;) Cloudberry jam is WONDERFUL!! Just don't have enough friends coming backwards and forwards from Scandanavia to bring it here! I must try and find an internet source ...... :D

M

You can come and pick for yourself! August is fine.

That sounds like a great idea for when I get my private jet!

On a more realistic note: if I were to travel to collect the berries, would I be allowed to carry them back to the UK, I wonder ? Not something I have previously considered.... must check the import regulations for fresh fruit  :-\

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Yes Trond, we eat cloudberries by the gallons...we call them bakeapples!  Another interesting story behind that name!  Personally, I don't care for the flavour but many Newfoundlanders love them.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Liked learning about "tuckamore" derivation... interesting.

Oh, you people "in the know", you all seem to know what "cloudberry" is... so I'm looking through the previously posted photos, trying to guess which is "cloudberry", you see, the actual correlation to the plant genus-species is not made, so I look up the probably edibles, both Vaccinium and Rubus, and it turns out to be Rubus chamaemorus.  Maybe I should know this, but I don't.

So, for those who wonder what the hey Cloudberry is, here's a link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_chamaemorus

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Liked learning about "tuckamore" derivation... interesting.

Oh, you people "in the know", you all seem to know what "cloudberry" is... so I'm looking through the previously posted photos, trying to guess which is "cloudberry", you see, the actual correlation to the plant genus-species is not made, so I look up the probably edibles, both Vaccinium and Rubus, and it turns out to be Rubus chamaemorus.  Maybe I should know this, but I don't.

So, for those who wonder what the hey Cloudberry is, here's a link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_chamaemorus

Sorry, Mark and others! Didn't think! I believed everybody knew what molte/cloudberry/ Rubus chamaemorus was!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Ahhh Trond, we northerners assume too much of the southerners!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

PS:
Mark, should you (or any other southerner not familiar with cloudberry) come this way I hereby invite you to taste cloudberry! Depending on season you may get only jam, but in the right season you shall have  the proper berry! Warning: Somebody dislike it alltogether and somebody can't live without!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Liked learning about "tuckamore" derivation... interesting.

Oh, you people "in the know", you all seem to know what "cloudberry" is... so I'm looking through the previously posted photos, trying to guess which is "cloudberry", you see, the actual correlation to the plant genus-species is not made, so I look up the probably edibles, both Vaccinium and Rubus, and it turns out to be Rubus chamaemorus.  Maybe I should know this, but I don't.

So, for those who wonder what the hey Cloudberry is, here's a link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_chamaemorus

Mark, I have thought of you these days! We have had cloudberry jam, cloudberry cream etc every other day! Nam nam ;) ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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