Cyclamen 2011/12

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deesen
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31
Cyclamen 2011/12

Some of the early Cyclamen species are in flower here, just a few below for your interest. All grown from seed from one or other of the Exchanges.

Cyclamen intaminatum looking very wet and miserable out in the garden, I shall bring it into the greenhouse next year.
C. cilicium a nice deep pink form.
C. mirabile ex. forma niveum 'Tilebarn Jan'

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The ruffled leaf edges on Tilebarn Jan is especially pleasing,
not to mention the flower itself!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Yes, it is pretty.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Manfroni
Manfroni's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-06-02

I just forgot that I have six hardy cyclamen bulbs in my backyard that I dug up last Spring! I better run and plant them in the ground!!!!

Rino, zone 7/8a Dallas TX, rainfall 38 inch or 1 meter per year (highest rainfall in May with 5.29in/134mm, March with 4.34in/110mm and October with 4.21in/107mm), mild winters with 1-2 days of snow (Record low -1F/-18C) and hot, semi-humid summers (Reco

Anonymous
Title: Guest

I planted two Cyclamen hederifolium (neapolitanum) in my Garden back in the Spring of 2010.  They were from a Dutch Bulb company.  I was surprised to find them for sale at Menard's.  I did not really believe they would survive the winter in Schaumburg, IL.  I planted them in the best spot I had available at time.  This location is in full sun with only meager shade from a scrawny Rhododendron.  At least one survived the winter and squirrels.  It only had a few leaves this Spring.  I was very surprized when I came home from a trip to find the flowers that are shown in the attached photo.  It appears they really can survive our cold winters.  The only protection it received was an inch of peat moss and the leaves I used to mulch the Rhododendron.

A note about the photo.  The flowers had much more pink/lavender than appears in the photo.

James 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It does amaze me, all the neglect that cyclamen can put up with.  I had some seedlings given to me in a tiny pot that I had forgotten all about :'(.  Almost any other plant would have kicked the bucket, but not these!  :)

Cyclamen purpurascens and C. hederifolium are practically the only species that have been hardy for us in Minnesota. This information comes from our resident expert in the genus, who grows these species on a wooded east facing slope in zone 3!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Anonymous
Title: Guest

Thanks for the hardiness information.  Maybe I'll give Cyclamen purpurascens a try.  This would give me a Cyclamen that flowers in Summer.

Has anyone tried growing Cyclamen coum at the Northern limit of its hardiness range.  It would be nice to have some Spring flowering Cyclamens.

James

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

C. purpurascens is definitely the hardier of the two for us.  Hederifolium sometimes doesn't make it.  People have tried coum up here, but it has never been reliable.  I would imagine though, that somewhere there is a hardy enough provenance.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

For some years I've grown the all green-leaved form of C. purpurescens, but then I got hold of some seed and plants of variable fancy-leaved types.  Now they are seedling in together, providing a long season of flowers all summer, but well worth growing and enjoyable now in the fall months with beautifully marked foliage, and a few entirely silvery-white leaves forms.  They are most forgiving of drought, heat, cold, and adverse conditions in general... a fine species for New England gardens.

In the photo, some all-green types at the top, but most the others are beautifully veined and marked.  The variegated leaf violets came in with the green-leaved plants given to me years ago, and I allow it to intermingled with the Cyclamen.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, Mark - what a display!  :o

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

A colony of varied leaf forms (and flowers, too)  is always more interesting than any single type, in my opinion, no matter how good the one type is.  Knowing at least some of all the plants you grow, Mark, I think you'll agree.  ;D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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