Crocus 2011

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tony, I second the appraisal that you C. pelistericus is stunning, such deep color!

Trond, I like your "nonagonous" Crocus bloom (nonagon = 9 sides).  Lable it, then it should be interesting to see if that characteristic persists in following years.

Wim, C. veluchensis looks good, not sure why it is such a seldom grown species here, it should be hardy and doable in our climate.
I came across this photo, with receding ice:
http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/35358201.jpg

A few photos from today, sunny with tempertaure just a hair above freezing, stiff cold wind; the crocus barely able to "crack a smile" and open their flowers a bit, although the C. chrysanthus hybrid seedlings seem a bit more immune to the cold.

Left to right:  
C. sieberi 'Firefly', C. chrysanthus hybrid seedlings, C. angustifolius (from Jane McGary), C. gargaricus.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Slowly it warmed to the upper 30s F today, and eventually Crocus blooms opened up:

Two views of Crocus angustifolius, a form from Jane McGary, with C. etruscus 'Rosalind' behind, still refusing to open its blooms.

 

From left to right:
C. sieberi ssp. sublimis 'Tricolor' - used to have a wide patch of this, then varmints got at them one year, so I'm rebuilding stock.
C. gargaricus again, finally opening its perfect pudgy goblets of gold, among my top 10 fav crocus species.
C. chrysanthus - mixed hybrid seedlings
C. chrysanthus - beautiful cream tinged pale lavender, a hybrid seedling.

   

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I'll be sharing mine in May when they are distant memories for the rest of you!  :(

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

After a 2-day snow-induced Crocus hiatus, the snow has melted, the sun is warm, and once again Crocus are smiling.  I'm always surprised how crocus can magically break ground and appear in flower in just 1-2 days, such is the case with the lovely C. malyi, one of my favorites with pristine white flowers and bright orange-yellow stamens & stigmas.

Growing among a group of A. malyi I got from Jane McGary in 2002; the two seedling plants have huge flowers that are exactly double the size of normal C. malyi blooms; not sure what caused these plants to have such large flowers, but I think it is worth singling these two out and attempt increasing them.  The extra large blooms are easy to spot, they are over 3" (8 cm) wide.  Notice in the side views, the tubes are dark brownish orange near the top on some seedlings (including the large-flowered ones), or light yellow on others.

Crocus malyi 'Ballerina' (white), C. angustifolius (gold), C. kosaninii (blue purple)

Two views of C. sieberi ssp. sublimis 'Tricolor' (2 left photos) + species Crocus view (3rd) + C. chrysanthus hybrid seedlings view (right)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I can't resist taking photos of Crocus on bright sunny days, as the blooms open fully to welcome the sun's warmth.  And so I shall take photos of these beauties, because after 17 months of unemployment (but unfettered constant access to the garden), I have rejoined the rat-race with a new job and huge daily commute, I'm back once again to photographing the garden only on weekends (if the sun comes out); a mixed blessing.  So, I photograph the very dwarf and beautiful C. imperati suaveolens even though mostly still just in bud, because in another week they might be over entirely.

C. chrysanthus hybrid seedlings (left) + C. imperati suaveolens (center) + C. etruscus 'Rosalind' (right)

One of the very best dwarf species with charming tiny flowers and gregarious colonizing habit, is C. kosaninii.  While under snow for two days, this species appeared and is jumping at the chance to bloom.  In a couple view, the gold-yellow is C. angustifolius.  Last year, I believe due to the unrelenting heat and drought, this species set no seed.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

It is a huge difference between your Croci and mine, Mark! Yours open their flowers, mine do not - I lack sunshine :(
Yours have short leaves and a dominant flower, mine have huge leaves and lanky flowers :( :(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Beautiful, Mark!!  8) 8)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Great display Mark!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Wonderful, Mark. It looks very much like spring  ;) ;)

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

My first crocus are somewhat open.  Most are still under snow but the one bed that is melted responded to the cool sun today.  Crocus tommasinianus , C. t. Ruby Giant, C. t. 'Lilac Beauty/

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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