Corydalis

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Well, it looks splendid where it is located ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I wonder what the parents of 'Wildside Blue' are? In UK gardens there have been a lot of hybrids coming up between elata and flexuosa, we've had a couple even in our dry garden, and these are usually evergreen like elata, unless it gets too dry and then they just disappear. This corydalis is really good if you can find it, though not a brilliant blue - superb winter foliage.

(Moderator: adding plant name so that it is searchable: Corydalis quantmeyeriana 'Chocolate Stars')

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim, it had probably succumbed to the desiccating easterly winds we have had all winter. But I am on the lookout for it though ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Copperbeach, I hadn't heard of Corydalis 'Wildside Blue', your plant looks fantastic.  From what I have found out about it, it is thought to be a C. elata seedling, but whether its a hybrid or not remains to be seen, the photos I see of it look lust like C. elata. It originates from Wildside Nursery in the UK.  It should be noted that C. elata is variable, with some very dark blue forms in the UK. Also, looking through the ponderous list of species in Flora of China, with a whole bunch in the "Elata Group" and closely related species, there is some question whether plants in cultivation as C. elata might actually be C. omeiana or C. harrysmithii, or even hybrids.

There was a lot of discussion about this on the Scottish Rock garden Club forum here:
http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=4903.msg145287#msg145287

Link for C. 'Wildside Blue'
http://gardencanadensis.ca/fusian/index.php/peren/corydalis/corydalis-wi...

Tim, I've seen that Corydalis photo before (Corydalis quantmeyeriana 'Chocolate Stars'), so it reminds me that I have considerable lust for it ;) :rolleyes: The foliage reminds me of a young Aralia for some reason, very ornamental.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

copperbeech
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-03-15

Hoy wrote:

Well, it looks splendid where it is located ;)

Thank you. It was fine in May and June but in July and August it shut down in terms of flowering due to the too sunny location and our too hot summer last year. I will relocate it (assuming it shows up this spring ;)).

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Oh, I should've mentioned, while C. elata flower in summer and "tend" to stay in growth thoughout the summer season, they will retreat to early dormancy if they're too dry; if keep moist and shaded the foliage will remain much longer.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

copperbeech
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-03-15

Mark, the 'blurb' I had seen regarding "Wildside Blue" (from the nursery I obtained it from) was that it is a hybrid developed by British nursery man Keith Wiley. And yes your link gives good information. Again I chose "Wildside" with the hope that it would not melt away. But now that I think about it maybe I have not been quite fair to this plant. I was thinking that it would bloom as well as "Lutea", which it did not, BUT I think the one in my posted picture did not actually hibernate if that means that the foliage remained visible the whole season.

Is that everyone else's experience with blue corydalis ie less floriferous than lutea?

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

McDonough wrote:

Tim, I've seen that Corydalis photo before (Corydalis quantmeyeriana 'Chocolate Stars'), so it reminds me that I have considerable lust for it ;) :rolleyes: The foliage reminds me of a young Aralia for some reason, very ornamental.

Mark....This Corydalis has been grown and sold by Sunny Border Nursery in the past. When I worked for Ward's Nursery in Gt. Barrington, MA I was able to get it from SBN.....but that was 6-7 years ago. Not sure if they still offer it.

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Amy, I'll have to look for it.  If Sunny Border still has it, it is likely to show up at local nurseries, SBN supplies many of the New England area nurseries, I see their tags on plants all the time.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

More on Corydalis elata / omeiana.  I've meticulously gone through the Flora of China keys, and feel that the plant I'm growing as C. elata does indeed key closest to C. elata, and next closest to C. harrysmithii, very close but a bit less like omeiana.  The word out there is that "everything" in cultivation as C. elata is C. omeiana, but that flies in the face of the fact both species are known to be grown, omeiana and true elata. See the second link for more detailed analysis.

http://www.rizreyes.com/Corydalis_omeiana.html

Here is the same topic (C. elata vs omeiana) revisited in lots of botanical detail:
http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=4903.msg156612#msg156612

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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