Cliff Seep Community

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

James - brilliant pictures of Watkins Glen. This must be an amazing place to explore botanically and geologically. I can imagine it being used in a Tolkeinesque mythology!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Anonymous
Title: Guest

I found some pictures of Leedy's Roseroot taken at the end of May.  The pictures show the blooms more open.  I am posting them here for your pleasure. 

If you look at where this plant chooses to grow on the cliff, you will notice it is almost always under the protection of an over hanging ledge.  It seems like the plant is trying to seek cover from hail storms.  It does choose a rather precarious habitat.  While photographing these plants I did notice a small individual floating in the waters of Lake Seneca.  This little fellow must have by chance grown in a location that was just a little too exposed.

Hail storms were surprisingly common during my plant adventures at this time of year.  At Taughannock Falls a ranger drove up the access road and told me there was a Tornado Warning.  She tried to press me to leave, but I honestly could not think of a safer place to be than at the bottom of a deep gorge. 

While driving home I often ran into hail storms that were so vicious I had to pull my car off the highway.  Not only to minimize damage to my car, but as because I could not see beyond my bumper.  Often while I was waiting for the storm to pass my wife would call to tell me they had just issued a tornado warning for the exact area where I was parked.  There was nothing much I could do about the situation at that point.

I never did get hit by a tornado, at least ... not yet.  Considering I resided in Nebraska during all my grade school years, it would have been a shame if a Tornado had gotten me right after relocating to the East.

James 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Very interesting place, James! And interesting set of conservation issues.. let us know if you learn anything else, or are able to get seeds, etc..

In my immediate area, all land is private land, apart from roadways and the ditches beside them (even then, depending on the individual spot and how road construction and subsequent fence building went, the ditches/roadsides may extend into private property) and there is certainly no expectation that you can walk on anyone else's property without permission! While doing my roadside botanising, I rarely extend anything more than a camera lens over the fence onto someone's property (since typically, I don't even know whose property it is- houses can be as little as 1/4 mile apart, up to several miles, and you never know if their house is at the end of the property or in the middle, or land can be owned or leased by someone living some distance away, etc, so asking permission would be complicated, and I would only do it for really special sites- haven't made any attempt so far!). Their is a site not far away with no fences and no 'No Trespassing' signs where I have gone a few metres beyond the roadside to photograph a rich plant community and collect some seed, and another site where I crossed a fence to collect seed of Delphinium glaucum- being fairly sure the landowner would be happy to have fewer of these poisonous plants growing in a pasture...lol But in any case- If I'm so much as leaning across a fence, I make sure to keep an ear open for any approaching vehicle that might have a suspicious land-owner in it..lol

Once into the foothills and mountains, its mostly public land- parks/wilderness areas etc which you can usually access with various constraints, and are protected to varying degress, and also provincial forestry land, which you are allowed to travel around on, and can get permits for things like cutting firewood or christmas trees, or digging seedling trees for transplanting!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am very glad I never need to bother who is the owner of a property. As long as I don' tread on farmland with vegetables or in a cornfield or in the garden next to a house I can walk whereever I want!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

People here are not nearly so accomodating...lol.. even staying in the ditches I get some very funny looks! If I am riding my bike they probably think I'm weird but recognise it as exercise, I guess... if I am walking, they think my car must have broken down, and some people seem to think I may be looking to commit some crime- maybe because I am without a vehicle they think I am going to steal one?? lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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