Cimicifuga / Actaea

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Plummer
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-01
Cimicifuga / Actaea

I have Cimicifuga racemosa which is in flower now, C. americana, C. japonica which is about to flower. I have a third plant (actually dozens of them) which grows as tall as C. racemosa and starting to flower. The obvious difference is that the leaves are huge, as much as 9-10 in (20-25 cm) wide. Is this a different species or a form of racemosa?

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Possibly cordifolia?

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, sounds wonderful!  I'd love to see photos!
C. cordifolia sure sounds like a possibility... I only have the cultivar 'Blickfang' which has large leaves but not so large as you describe.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, here's the difference caused by many degrees of latitude... my Actaea (Cimicifuga) racemosa have just started to bloom in what is almost mid-August, as compared to early July for Plummer in New York State!  I love these plants... the 2 original plants have formed massive, stately clumps after many years:

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

Well, here's the difference caused by many degrees of latitude... my Actaea (Cimicifuga) racemosa have just started to bloom in what is almost mid-August, as compared to early July for Plummer in New York State!  I love these plants... the 2 original plants have formed massive, stately clumps after many years:

Started to bloom now? That's early compared to my plants. They are among the last ones to flower and typically bloom in October.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The various cultivars of Actaea simplex bloom later for me than Actaea racemosa... though not so late as October, usually.  (If they haven't bloomed by then, they'd be frozen off!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

How much sun are those racemosa in?  Mine do not stand that "stately".

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The one plant is planted on the north side of a lattice trellis (as you can see in the photo) and gets about 8 hours of sun per day.  The other plant is in slightly more sun (and is currently being swamped by Rosa 'Therese Bugnet').  It doesn't get hot here though.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

ncole
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

8 hours of sun?  Well it must be the heat factor then...I cannot imagine it here in even afternoon sun....but it sure looks better than mine ever have!

I live in Baltimore, Md. zone7 and have a woodland garden....for over 30 years...so I am old.

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Our simplex are just flowering and are slightly over 6ft tall. Sun is not a factor here,they are planted in wet heavy soil and apart from five odd days it has rained every day since 5th May. What is sun?

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Tony wrote:

... apart from five odd days it has rained every day since 5th May. What is sun?

Egad!  Have there been mass suicides?!?   :o :o  Weather like that is really unimaginable here.  What part of the UK are you in?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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