Calypso bulbosa and associates, Banff National Park, mid-June

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

IMYoung wrote:

McDonough wrote:

 The close-up views of the yellow flowers with red hairs sure look attractive.  have you ever found natural hybrids between it and octopetala?

The natural hybrid between D. drummondii and D. octopetala is, of course,
called Dryas x suendermannii and there is a super photo of it here in the NARGS wiki by Todd Boland...
 http://www.nargs.org/nargswiki/tiki-browse_image.php?imageId=453

That is a super photo that Todd took and posted to the NARGS photo galleries (reminds me, I should be doing the same, posting to the gallery).  Maggi, thanks for jogging my memory, it was easier to say drummondii and octopetala hybrid as I was drawing a blank on the natural hybrid name... been sniffing too many alliums ;D 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Mark, I only grow D. octopetala in the garden at present.  I've never seen anything in the wild that I suspected to a be hybrid between the two... but, heck, I only just noticed D. integrifolia last summer (I think!?), so there's no telling whether I'd even recognize a hybrid between the other species!  ???  In the areas where we hike, the two species usually seem to be separated by a considerable elevation range... though I suppose if bees travel miles, it's certainly possible for hybrids to occur.  Roadsides, into the higher elevations, seem to bring the two species into proximity, though.
At any rate, hybrids between D. octopetala and D. drummondii aren't noted in Flora of Alberta, for whatever reason.  It is noted that hybridization occurs between D. octopetala and D. integrifolia here, though.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Back tracking a bit but wanted to say how much I enjoyed seeing your pictures of Calypso bulbosa, Lori.  Coming from Victoria, BC, have wanted to grow some of the plants from out that way for quite a while - such as C. bulbosa and the native Dogwood (different from the eastern Cornus florida).  Did bring home the little orchid in a pot one time (a cousin owned a woodlot where it grew) and almost got it flowering until the emerging bud was cruelly cut down by a miserable cutworm.  However, I'm on my way out to Victoria next week and am still looking??  Another cousin told me of a Calypso bulbosa website in Mendocino county, California.  They export the seed ($20 including shipping and handling for 300 seeds) - no phyto required.  There are instructions about its propogation.  Also remember bringing home some of the very special Dias orchids in agar, bought quite cheaply from Kirstenbosch Garden in Capetown.  But, unfortunately, no luck.  I think they are "fire friendly" plants.  The people at Fraser's Thimble Farm on Saltspring Island told my cousin they don't carry it as it is too difficult to propagate.  Fran

Reed
Reed's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-10-09

I know that Calypso bulbosa would be very difficult to grow from seed unless you have the mycorrhizal fungi and sometimes multiple types that it has to have in the protocorm tissue for the seed to sprout.
Most Calypso bulbosa are wild dug and will perish unless you can keep the Mycorrhiza alive. They grow in the Pacific Coast mountains all over and flower from March-June depending on elevation.

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Mark: don't know if you will check this stale thread or not...but I noticed you asking about Dryas drummondii: Laporte Avenue Nursery sells this, and I have grown it for years. It has produced its nodding yellow flowers for me. I don't think it's much harder to grow than typical D. octopetala.

I have also grown the hybrid, although I don't have it currently. I'm surprised both of these aren't grown more often. I suspect they aren't better known because they need to grow in the ground (they have massive roots) rather than pots, ergo: absent from alpine houses...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Kelaidis wrote:

Mark: don't know if you will check this stale thread or not...but I noticed you asking about Dryas drummondii: Laporte Avenue Nursery sells this, and I have grown it for years. It has produced its nodding yellow flowers for me. I don't think it's much harder to grow than typical D. octopetala.

Thanks Panayoti, whenever I get back into a plant buying mode, I'll check it out at Laporte, along with a bushel load of other plants on my growing want list. :D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice outing, Lori, and nice to be able to share it with your sister :)
Calypso is not rare here, but not common either, though not forming large patches generally, probably since it favours semi damp mixed wood spots which are unstable (growing over and becoming too shady, short lived trees falling, etc)..
So I was very impressed to see this clump (Many of you have seen this, but I thought I'd post it here for anyone who hasn't) , also in Banff National Park, close to Lake Louise, just off the road (visible from a roadside pullout); May 30, 2009; unlike plants here, this was growing at the edge of Pine woods (if I am remembering correctly! coniferous trees, at any rate..) with almost no undergrowth to compete with.. It would seem like  a dry place (under the conifers), except for probably heavy snowfall and generally higher precip than here..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Cohan, a gorgeous clump of Calypso bulbosa, something I hope to encounter in the wild some day.  Looks like there are two varieties in North America, and var. americana comes very close to the little State of Massachusetts based on the USDA plant profile page and distribution map.
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CABU

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A very nice one to see by the roadside, Cohan, and a spectacular clump!

The montane forest around Lake Louise is truly full of them and at incredible density... imagine a density like the clump you show but going for kilometers along the trails!! 
We were a little too early when my sister and I visited (as I realized later, it was a verrrrry late spring in most of the mountain areas that we visit)... I may try to time it a little better this year.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Wow, Cohan. 

That is amazing.  I always wonder how they'd do here, given our Pterostylis and other terrestrial orchids.  Few of ours ever put up a show nearly as impressive as that. :o

Thanks for showing us.

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

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