Books on Gardening

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nold wrote:

Here's the coolest thing I've acquired lately. (For a couple of dollars more.)  It's in mint condition which is why I didn't fully open the pages.

Bob

So you don't read it but just admire it ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Nold wrote:

I don't really have anything better to do than spend time looking for books online. (The dog would disagree.) My latest acquisition was a near-new copy of Correll and Johnston's Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas for $18. Eighteen dollars. Ten cents a page.
It's best not to tell anyone about your secret passions (mine is collecting monographs, etc.) otherwise the prices might go up.
Here's the coolest thing I've acquired lately. (For a couple of dollars more.)  It's in mint condition which is why I didn't fully open the pages.

Bob

Wow, a flora of Texas has always represented a major void in my US flora-by-state coverage; at only $18 it's a steal.  I see an old friend in the photos you posted, I have the same Gentes Herbarum treatment on Aquilegia, with exquisite line drawings inside, in fact, I have scanned some of these and under fair use provisions posted them here on NARGS and on SRGC Forums:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=151.msg4872#msg4872

I see from a light pencil scribble inside the cover, I paid $12.50, but then again, that was back about 30 years ago.  You made a good "find".  I'm a sucker for such publications, but I more or less "kicked the habit" when I had children, disposable income was harder to come by then... still is.  But maybe I should start my antique-book-hounding again  ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

But maybe I should start my antique-book-hounding again

No, you shouldn't. You should leave all that to me......
Just like when all the new Karel Lang porophyllum sax hybrids make it to the U.S. (or Canada), I should get all those, too. http://www.skalnicky.cz/saxifraga_lang.php 
(I think AbeBooks does have another copy of Correll and Johnston that isn't over a hundred dollars.)

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

James, that's a very useful page on plant surface terminology.  Like Lori, I also have the book Plant Identification Terminology and I wondered why it didn't have such a comparison.  But it does!  Somehow I missed the whole surface section when I was perusing it for the first time a few months ago.  I am very impressed:

             

In a perfect world, everyone would use the same exact definitions for identification terminology, but we aren't always on the same page.  An even better reason to have the author of a key explain pictorially what he (or she) actually means.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

In a perfect world, everyone would use the same exact definitions for identification terminology

I can think of several instances where botanists disagree as to whether or not the taxon in question even possesses the described characteristics, e.g. the presence of a hypogynous nectary disc in Pennellianthus (Penstemon) frutescens.
And just try to find out where Yucca baileyi really grows. Some authorities say it grows all around me, but I've never seen it. Others say it doesn't grow anywhere near me. Some say southern Colorado, some say Utah, some say New Mexico, some ignore it altogether.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Sometimes it's worth thinking of the books that have never been written. The late Jim Archibald studied literature and was an exquisite writer when describing his travels in the AGS Bulletin. But sadly as others have said he never wrote about his exploits in other ways, as for example other great plant collectors like Kingdom Ward. On the other hand his legacy to our gardens was immense and the connections he made with other gardeners through his seedlists unequalled.

It seems to me that in recent years much of the very best writing about gardening has come from the States, and what I like most are books by figures like Claude Barr who combined the botanical and gardening aspects of plants so well, and stimulated others to grow the plants too. The other book I find completely inspirational and beautifully produced is 'Rocky Mountain Alpines', Alpines '86. The combination of articles covering geology, geography, plants and gardens is superb. It would be great if more people (gardeners) could see the gamut of subjects that the alpine garden societies are interested in!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

Sometimes it's worth thinking of the books that have never been written.

I can think of a lot that should never have been written ......
One of the true treasures of rock gardening literature has never been published in book form (discounting one custom binding that I know of), namely, the articles written by Dwight Ripley in his travels through western North America with Rupert Barneby, and some travels in the Mediterranean (or maybe only Spain, I forget).
They appeared as articles in the AGS bulletins of the 1940s, and thanks to the AGS they are now available on the CD-ROMs published by the society. 

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Schier
Schier's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-02-16

True, the books that haven't been written.  I scrounge used book stores
( in person book stores ), library sales, anything to find books, including of course!
good gardening books. ( and needless to say, online too ) To find a real treasure is
such a treat! But, back to books that haven't been written, I agree totally, so many
gardeners and plant explorers with so much to say, and how we would love to read
what they might write.
** those Karel Lang sax hybrids are almost enough to make me swoon!

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Writing gardening books is a huge amount of work if facts are of major importance. Checking and rechecking day after day. And even then, it's possible to make stunning mistakes.
This is my idea of a real gardening book. And possibly the funniest book I've ever read this side of H. Allen Smith. I remember reading it aloud to my late wife and the two of us laughed so hard we almost passed out.
Bob

(first edition)

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Are you sure you don't mean "P." Allen Smith, Bob? He's pretty funny, but in other connotations of the word I suppose...You shall make me re-read my Farrer talking about him that way...I am probably one of relatively few livingt people who have read The English Rock Garden from cover to cover. Several times, actually. And there are some howlers in that (incluidng the monocot Dracocephalums). Most of the howlers are intentional, however...

Love the pix of all your acquisitions! Books are so beautiful. I don't find the bargains nowadays BECAUSE of the Abebooks, Alibris and all the rest, which let booksellers know the going price of things, as well as get them out to the world at large.

I wonder that you haven't decided to invest in a Kindle and obviate all that papyrus!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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