Bloodroot - Sanguinaria canadensis

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Do decomposed poplar leaves make a good compost? Aspen (and birch) leaves do not give any rich soil! Neither do oak nor beech leaves, they're very tough too. Maple, linden and elm leaves make better compost. Spruce, fir and pine needles make a very good soil for rhodos and other woodland plants.

My soil is black and very light. I make a lot of compost of all kind of plant and animal residue. I also mix in a lot of sand and something we call "subbus":

I grow the bloodroot in soil made of compost and "subbus". It seems to like that but not the common black soil here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Allison
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Joined: 2010-04-08

If the Bloodroot plants around my area are anything to go by, I'd say they need good drainage and lean soil. The best colonies are on slopes under fairly light tree canopy. I've heard that some people have trouble keeping it going for more than a few years in their gardens - they tell me the clump collapses suddenly - and my guess is that they are giving it too rich conditions and the plant is suffering from the attendant increase in soil pathogens. The native orchids have the same problems in gardens, I think.

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Trond, i have no idea what nutrients decomposed leaves have! We have aspen and balsam poplars and birches... willows are not enough in the yard to have any impact.. the leaves of those mentioned decompose quickly enough (if you can keep them moist- they can shed water in piles and stay completely dry inside if not turned regularly) and over several years will give a nice looking blackish stuff- usually still mixed with bits of leaves at the point I would use it-- but I have no idea what the nutrient content of that stuff is....

We have only a couple of very small maples, not enough to collect much in the way of leaves, same for my one modest linden...lol... no elms anywhere around here.. no oaks or beech either (in fact, I wouldn't know a beech if I saw it, and only a slight idea about elms but there are none here...lol)

Lis, thanks for the thoughts, I'll have to think about how it relates to my situation!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Toole
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Pink in bud --faded quickly today --Sanguinaria canadensis close up.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Multiple petaled, I see, too.  :)

Interesting that the petals recurve.  They don't do that here at all, in the wild or in the garden, and no matter how old the flower is. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Still seems to be a sort of 'richer' white.. nice :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Plummer
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-01

On two separate occasions I have had Multiplex' appear at sites I would not have planted any of my plants.

Any thoughts?

Allison
Allison's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-04-08

Plummer wrote:

On two separate occasions I have had Multiplex' appear at sites I would not have planted any of my plants.

Any thoughts?

Yes, go out and buy a lottery ticket, quick!

Gardening on a wooded rocky ridge in the Ottawa Valley, Canada. Cold winters (-30C) and hot, humid summers. Nuts about native plants, ferns, pottery, my family, and Border Collies.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Bill, any chance that there were pieces of rhizome that might have been dug out inadvertently when transplanting some other plant? I'm with Lis on this, if these are just showing up in your garden, you're very lucky (might not be a bad idea to rush out and buy a lotto ticket as Lis suggests ;) ).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Plummer wrote:

On two separate occasions I have had Multiplex' appear at sites I would not have planted any of my plants.

Any thoughts?

They might have come in (in the potting mix) with other nursery stock.  Also, rodents will move bulbs and roots around.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

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