Asperula

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15
Asperula

I have some annual night-scented Asperula in the garden. This year I try a perennial, Asperula nitida (Rubiaceae). Not floriferous first year but better next year!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

What is the annual, night-scented one you grow?  I'm curious -no ideas are springing to mind...

Very nice Asperula nitida.
I guess I only took this one fuzzy photo of Asperula gussonii this year (or so it was said to be that, though the flowers are quite white, rather than pink).  It is almost done blooming now.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A couple of Asperula boissieri, from seed this year.  I wonder if I can expect flowers next year?

Seed from Pavelka:  "2200m, Killini Mts., Greece; very dwarf compact silvery-grey cushions; stemless pale to dark rose flowers; limestone rocky slopes, 2006 seed."

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

What is the annual, night-scented one you grow?  I'm curious -no ideas are springing to mind...

I think it is Asperula arvensis. They are growing together with another night-scented species: Zaluzianskya capensis, which has the stronger scent though.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hello folks, I have moved this topic from the "Family, Genera, Species" board to "General Alpines". :)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30

You raised the profile of this thread by moving it, Mark ... here are two images of Asperula sintenisii (from Mt. Ida in Turkey) ... the first growing in Anne Spiegel's beautiful garden in New York State and the second in the magnificent Allen Centennial Garden in Madison, Wisconsin.

ASPERULA SINTENISII

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Fantastic specimens Cliff, if ever there was "plant candy", a well-flowered Asperula is it.  Yes, by adding my "topic moved message" it did indeed raise its profile, and it worked ;D  Both are wonderful plants, but the sheer number of blooms and buds on the one at Allen Centennial Garden is stupendous. :o

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

They are marvelous plants while in bloom in the garden and quite capable of making a "splash".  Most of them will take over a trough but do very well in scree conditions in the open garden.  The label was lost on the one in the picture, unfortunately, but it's very happy in the tufa garden, and currently duking it out with a daphne.  It will have to be trimmed back and hopefully propagated.  It would be nice to discover that it layered itself.  Can't wait until spring to find out.

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

I certainly have to get more of these plants! - and hope that my one plant so far can compete with those shown here ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Asperulas of various sorts have become an essential element in my rock gardens: I have grown over ten species, although at this point I am lucky to have a half dozen. A few of the stayers are shown below, beginning with a sort of overall shot of how they grow in the garden with Asperula pontica, the deepest pink and most vigorous of the species. Next is the very flashy A. sintenisii, and then the subtler A. nitida. The last another group shot of one along these same lines obtained as Asperula sp. ex Turkey (which gives a lot of latitude): I don't have any current pictures of Asperula daphneola, possibly the showiest species which has not proven very durable. I am also nuts for the arcadiensis types, which I don't seem to keep forever either. A great genus. I have grown huge cushions of Asperula gussonii at Denver Botanic Gardens, and a few other species, which I now realize we may have lost! I must check local gardens this spring and see if we can reintroduce them!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

All of you show beautiful plants and settings! I want to grow such nice plants in wonderful settings too ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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