Arisaema 2012

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Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Some Arisaema sikokianum, grown from seed:

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Your Arisaemas are so early! here they are the last plants to emerge - often not till midsummer!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

A. sikokianum is the earliest to bloom here, much earlier than triphyllum.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Same with me, Trond.  Usually the Asian types emerge in late June or July.  I don't have A. sikokianum.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Saori
Saori's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-10-10

Gene, that's quite a view! I think A. sikokianum is one of the most beautiful in this genus and you can't have too many of them!

I had only one sikokianum in my garden but I wanted to get some seeds, so I bought two more plants. Unfortunately, all my plants are still male and I have to wait till one of them turns female... But I found a very rare coloring of A. sikokianum! :D

One thing... My Arisaema kishidae is female right now but I only have one plant and don't have male plants to collect pollen from. Does anybody out there have this plant and if so wouldn't mind sharing some pollen with me? I will share some seeds later if I successfully harvest the fruits or I will trade some of the seeds I have right now. Please let me know!

From the beautiful Pacific Northwest, USA,
where summer is mild and dry but winter is dark and very wet... USDA Zone 7b or 8 (depends on the year)

 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Seems I have to get hold of A. sikokianum!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Saori, that color variant (a hybrid?) of A. sikokianum is awesome, beautifully presented photographs, I imagine them as Mr. & Mrs. Sikokianum :D  Please tell us, was that a spontaneous self-sown plant?  Is there a possibility that it hybridized with another Arisaema species?

Gene, I was starting to wonder about my A. sikokianum plants, as they're all facing west, but in your impressive colony, they're facing various directions, so it's probably just coincidence that my flowering plants are facing the same direction.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Saori
Saori's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-10-10

Mark, as far as I know, this is one of the variations of sikokianum. I found this one as a one-off in a group of more than 100. I believe that the nursery from which I bought it is growing only sikokianum and so I think that this is seed-grown, but I'm not sure. I should have asked... I saw a green version of sikokianum on some Japanese sites before (if you are interested, here is a good link: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/fu2ran/59116249.html) and, though I have only heard that it exists, there is also a red version of sikokianum. If my other sikokianum turns out to be female next year, I will use a pink sikokianum that I have to pollinate it, and hopefully I can take the F1 and cross it back again, so that I can hopefully create a pink sikokianum.

From the beautiful Pacific Northwest, USA,
where summer is mild and dry but winter is dark and very wet... USDA Zone 7b or 8 (depends on the year)

 

Zonedenial
Zonedenial's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-11

The two earliest arisaemas to bloom here are ternatipartitum (shown) and kishidae, which both open their "jacks" in early April before the leaves arise and tolerate temps below freezing after opening.

Don Bolin  Zone 5a in eastern Iowa, USA (corn country).

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Zonedenial wrote:

The two earliest arisaemas to bloom here are ternatipartitum (shown) and kishidae, which both open their "jacks" in early April before the leaves arise and tolerate temps below freezing after opening.

Some more to look for! I am always interested in early flowering plants. Are they woodlanders?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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