Arisaema 2010

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Arisaema 2010

I've been fascinated with Arisaema triphyllum for most of my life, starting when I was 10 years old and my parent's property had wild brush areas full of A. triphyllum, Trillium cernuum, and poison ivy. I would lift each and every hooded spathe to see what color they were, running the gamut from all pale green to near black, various striping, and everything in between. The species is amazingly diverse, and wherever I come across it, the recognition of A. triphyllum is immediate, yet it seems there is always some unique and varying characteristics that set that individual apart. What I like about this one too, is that it flowers late, usually late May or early June.

Just took a quick look through my digital image library, and here's a sampling of varying forms of Arisaema triphyllum. I'm sure you're well familiar with such variation, but those viewers less familiar with this species might enjoy seeing the variation.

1 - veined leaves and light pie-crust-crimped edge, large leaves

2 - dark black-purple spathe and spadix

3 - top half dark spathe, lower portion white, light green spadix

4 - dark spathe, visibly striped on the *outside* of the flower

5 - dark spathe, glaucous purple stems and leaf petioles

6 - attractive form found in nearby woods, low growing, very wide striped flower
7 - another view of the same local form, notice the dark stippling at the base of the flower.

8 - white-veined leaf form, emerging
9 - view from above showing the beautiful leaves
10 - flower is light green and white striped

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Just emerging is a variable hybrid between Arisaema amurense (itself rather variable) and A. tashiroi, the latter a slender plant with distinctive snake-skin marked leaf sheathes.  The hybrids are much shorter and more stout than the slender A. tashiroi, but inherit the richly colored stems.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Following up on my post about Arisaema amurense x tashiroi hybrids, here is more information and a photo essay.

I grow two forms of A. amurense, a robust one with green brownish-tinged flower (which the hybrids most resemble) and smaller all-green flowered ones, and rather close by I grew A. tashiroi.  A. kishidae was also there but that one died out a few years ago, however it remains a possibility this species is actually one of the parents... either parent could be responsible for the snake-skin marbled leaf sheathes that is not present on A. amurense.  I have sinced moved my A. tashiroi, where it seems happier and grows taller too.  I can post photos of both the hybrid plants flowering in 2009, along with A. tashiroi in 2009... will do so later on today.

photos 1-5    A. tashiroi
photos 6-7    A. amurense - robust form, with brownish flowers
photos 8-10  A. amurense x tashiroi, emerging flowers and foliage

photos 11-14 (in a second batch)  A. amurense x tashiroi, full flower and foliage, last photo shows fruit.

Note:  the robust A. amurense has flowers that smell badly of wet dog.  Interestingly, the A. amurense x tashiroi hybrid has flowers with the same bad smell.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

2nd batch of Arisaema amurense x tashiroi

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

For North American gardeners reading this, please post your photos of local or garden variety Arisaema triphyllum, I'd love to see them... who doesn't love Jack-in-the-Pulpit plants and their amazing diversity.  For members at large, post any interesting Arisaema photos, it is a huge, diverse, and intriguing genus!

USDA distribution map for A. triphyllum:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ARTR

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

For North American gardeners reading this, please post your photos of local or garden variety Arisaema triphyllum, I'd love to see them... who doesn't love Jack-in-the-Pulpit plants and their amazing diversity.  For members at large, post any interesting Arisaema photos, it is a huge, diverse, and intriguing genus!

I agree, Mark, although I got interested in Arisaema just recently. I grow a couple in my garden but as usual without names! I had 7 pots of seedlings in my cold greenhouse this winter and unfortunately some of them froze to death in this exceptionally cold (for me) winter. All the pots froze solid before I noticed it. Maybe they had fared better in the soil. I haven't considered acquiring triphyllum, it looked pale and uninteresting but your pictures have opened my eyes to that species too! When I think of it I have no pictures of mine plants. Arisaema is very late in germinating here so you have to wait for that.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Nice expose on Arisaema Mark.  No signs of mine yet but then they generally don't show until late May in my area.  I have loads of triphyllum, 2 whose tags I lost and have yet to bloom and a sikkokianum which is my fav.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Sorry, I just can't get excited about A. triphyllum.  It's too much of a thug here, and since my older brother though it would be a good idea to plant some in my parent's woods, unattended, I have been battling the take-over ever since.

I do grow a tentatively identified Arisaema franchetianum, which seems to grow to adulthood and bloom for 2 or 3 years, never to return.  But offsets from stolons(?) seem to assure its survival here.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Sorry, I just can't get excited about A. triphyllum.  It's too much of a thug here, and since my older brother though it would be a good idea to plant some in my parent's woods, unattended, I have been battling the take-over ever since.

I do grow a tentatively identified Arisaema franchetianum, which seems to grow to adulthood and bloom for 2 or 3 years, never to return.  But offsets from stolons(?) seem to assure its survival here.

That's what is amazing about gardening; the differences in how plants behave in varying areas.  Growing up in Massachusetts, the 'outskirts" of my parents yard were filled with A. triphyllum, but I would never have considered it a thug that would take over the yard or wild property... it was just here and there, as was Trillium cernuum.  In my 23 years here, it has never shown any signs of running amok, and it is mostly what I have planted that shows up.

I have never grown A. franchetianum, but I love all these Arisaema... Plant Delights Nursery lists this as a Zone 7 plant (tender), so it is interesting you can get it to a flowering point and then it disappears, but at least offsets survive for you.  So, I'm assuming you don't get seed?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

No seed yet, although there's only been maybe two times they could have.  The plant is very tall and seeming sturdy, but not very.  In the five or six years that it has bloomed, most of the time something happens - a storm or animal that knocks it over and breaks the stem.  Last year the mature bulb did not emerge, and I don't think the offsets will be large enough to bloom this season. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

No seed yet, although there's only been maybe two times they could have.  The plant is very tall and seeming sturdy, but not very.  In the five or six years that it has bloomed, most of the time something happens - a storm or animal that knocks it over and breaks the stem.  Last year the mature bulb did not emerge, and I don't think the offsets will be large enough to bloom this season. 

Hang in there.  I will post on a monster tall form of Arisaema heterophyllum I've grown for the last 10 years, growing each year to 6' tall, never setting seed.  Then in 2009, after the flowering stem fell over, I didn't bother stake it up, and maybe with ground-crawly bugs, the flower got fertilized and set seed.  The seed was very late to ripen, and in December got encased in snow and ice.  I have pictures after I chopped it out of the ice, and gathered the seed and cleaned it, then sowed seed in winter, and after a decade gone by, I now have 3 seedlings... expecting more to show up.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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