Argentina, December 2013

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Steve Newall
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Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

Thank you both for the lovely pictures . Much appreciated .

 

Will get there one day . Unfortunately the seasons clash for me but maybe one day when I'm semiretired and Mr.Toole has his bucket sorted ...

 

... and thanks for the warning Claire . If I see any laughing jandal clad Norwegians on a plant trip I'll down my beer , reach for my akvavit and prepare for the worst smiley

Balclutha , New Zealand

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

The drive from Bariloche to San Martin de los Andes was marked by lots of volcanic ash from the 2010-2011 eruption of the Planchón-Peteroa volcano, over 100 miles northwest in Chile. As you can see, plants of Saxifraga magellanica and Viola volcanica are nearly buried.

Saxifraga magellanica    Viola volcanica

Scenery, nevertheless, was beautiful and flowers were plentiful.  Oxalis nahuelhuapiensis (named after the lake, Lago Nahuel Huapi), Calceolaria polyrhiza (?), Vicia nigricans, Mutisia spinosa, Chloraea magellanica and Chloraea alpina.

   Oxalis nahuelhuapiensis   Calceolaria polyrhiza ?   Vicia nigricans

 

Mutisia spinosa   Chloraea magellanica   Chloraea alpina

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Here are some views along the road. Two very common roadside weeds were the European Cytisus scoparius and Rosa rubiginosa. On higher ground we encountered woods of Nothofagus antarctica. Some trees were killed, probably of the ash.

    

 

View of the road. Most of the roads here were unpaved and narrow. Berberis montana, a common woodland species. Anemone multifida is very variable. Some have larger flowers.

   

 

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lathyrus magellanicus along the road. We made several stops as the roadside was a plethora of colourful plants. Also the pretty shrub - small tree Embothrium coccineum was in flower along the road.

   

 

The first cactus we found in flower was this Austrocedruscactus patagonicus(?) on a rocky outcropping. The ash covered slopes of the Viola vulcanica habitat.

   

 

Viola vulcanica. The camouflage didn't work at its best in the new, grey ash. Oxalis adenophylla were everywhere and very variable - we found it even in dense shade.

    

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

I should mention that this tour was organized by Ger van den Beuken of the Netherlands.  He and his wife, Mariet, are great traveling companions and Ger's knowledge of Patagonian violas is impressive.  I couldn't have asked for a more caring couple as tour leads.

Trond, I think you meant Austrocactus -- a bit shorter than cedrus!  devil

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

This is all such a Treat!

 

I willingly display my ignorance about rosulate violets: I assume they are evergreen?

If so, it would seem they are more vigorous than I would have expected, that they would grow all that foliage in just two or less growing seasons after the ash fall out in such a harsh climate.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Cockcroft wrote:

Trond, I think you meant Austrocactus -- a bit shorter than cedrus!  devil

Are you sure surprise  thankswink

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

This is all such a Treat!

 

I willingly display my ignorance about rosulate violets: I assume they are evergreen?

If so, it would seem they are more vigorous than I would have expected, that they would grow all that foliage in just two or less growing seasons after the ash fall out in such a harsh climate.

Rick, I am afraid that I can't enlighten you much.

I assume some of them are deciduous (it was mentioned on the tour), and at least one is annual (you will see a picture later). At this altitude it is usually snow in the winter and some rain in the spring. Although we had sunny weather for 3 weeks the soil was still moist under the dry layer of ash and sand (or rock).

Viola sacculus

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Fascinating, all of them!

 

You really do have to watch where you step!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Fascinating, all of them!

 

You really do have to watch where you step!

 

Yes, some places you didn't see a single plant till you saw first one, and then one more and suddenly they were all over the place! (Sometimes even under your boots)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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