Anyone growing petrophytum?

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DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20
Anyone growing petrophytum?

Also posted in desert alpines.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

I've rown Petrophytum hendersonii for some years.  It is a reliable bloomer, and certainly handles drought.  Moe to the point for a northeasterner, it also seems to be able to adapt to the summer mugs that we have here.  I grow it in a limey scree.

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

We grow Petrophytum hendersonii here in Aberdeen, north -east Scotland.  Good reliable plant for a raised bed. Ours would be growing in something to the acid side of neutral.

We used to grow a form of P.caespitosa, too, with little rounded sessile flower heads.... (at least, I think it was a form of caespitosa) but it got fed up with the wet summers.... who could blame it ?

Maggi Y.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

I have Petrophyton hendersonii and Petrophyton caespitosum growing in the garden and they do OK but grow quite slowly. Both are in a mix with mostly sharp sand. I got my Petrophyton hendersonii from a nursery and it is definitely not the right plant having recently seen it in the wild:

http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=761.0

I have Petrophyton cinerascens in a plunge bed and once it gets bigger and I can get some cuttings I will try it outside.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
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DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

David wrote:

I have Petrophyton cinerascens in a plunge bed and once it gets bigger and I can get some cuttings I will try it outside.

How hard are they to start from a cutting?

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Cuttings of Petrophyton are not too difficult. I use a 50:50 mix of sharp sand and vermiculite with a plastic dome over a tray in the shade.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Thanks for the info. :)

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I have a picture of one at Denver Botanic Gardens in a blog I did a few years ago.
http://www.botanicgardensblog.com/2008/09/01/recondite-plants-what-are-they-where-are-they-1/

I have several very distinct forms of Petrophytum caespitosum thriving in various gardens: one form from Colorado gets very large and branced and has great vigor. It is the pale candles behind the Satureja in the picture below.

The second picture shows it closer up: those candles are over a foot long! Love this thing!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Those are some big candles :o

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Mikkelsen
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-09-04

I've grown Petrophytum caespitosum (Rock spirea) for four years in a half whiskey barrel. It's not demanding, however to get it to "crawl" it needs to be on the slightest slope on sandstone (preferred, since it crawls faster) or a limestone.

Here, in Utah, there are areas in some west desert cliffs where it grows in huge sheets that easily measure 6' wide x 10' long, welded to the cliffs. Surely worth growing!

Margin of the Great Basin Desert & Wasatch Mountains
4350' (1326m) Elevation; Zone 5a - 7a; 5 miles from the
climate moderating effects of The Great Salt Lake, Utah
J. Mikkelsen

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

I bet they are awesome.  Utah has some cool plants. :) 
 
I got mine from seed or a very small plant, but there was some very old plants in the area.  Looks like prehistoric moss growing over rocks, love it.

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

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