Anemonopsis macrophylla - foliage collapse

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Anemonopsis macrophylla - foliage collapse

I noticed today that 3 out of about 10 main foliage stems have collapsed, pulling on them shows that they have detached and are blacked at the base. Other stems also look like they are wilting a bit. Weather has been sufficiently moist, and not overly hot, but it looks like the whole thing is rotting. Any suggestions? Thank goodness I have a whole crop of seedlings coming along, as I fear this plant is on its way out for some reason.

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

I experienced the same with a pot of white-flowering A. macrophylla seedlings last year (while they were in their third year)...the entire pot died. Next to it was a pot with filled-flowering A. macrophylla, which all survived. My guess was that the soil mix was not free draining enough and when we had a late frost after a period of rain...they didn't like that. But it was very strange that the seedlings in the pot next to it, which was filled with exactly the same mix survived...maybe it was some kind of fungal disease? I would treat that plant with a broad-spectrum fungicide!

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

While not an actual reply to the Anemonopsis problem, I feel this is one of the "cultural problems" in my garden.  Over the years I have found it necessary to employ chicken wire to protect many plants from the diggings of squirrels and skunks...especially when the plants are young and/or freshly planted pout. Have become rather adept at creating several styles of structures from small domes, funnels for small trees and lately, for newly trimmed and settled in Iris fans - this one is the  largest so far and is like a bottomless box I put over the lot.  So far it seems to work.  Often this will involve moving other plants out of the way but at least there is some hope now that my prize Iris (a pale blue fragrant one) will survive.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Francis for your suggestions of protecting plants in general.  I have been battling with a woodchuck and a sole rabbit that have been eating the tops of Vernonia lettermanii; I need to construct a cone or some sort of wire protection around it, to give the plant a chance.

As to my dying Anemonopsis, more stems have rotted off at the base and have been pulled out, but I believe a few side shoots look healthy enough to carry on the day.  Also, I have a nice flat of seedlings, and for the first time in a decade, self-sown seedlings have appeared nearby.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Mark

I have had this problem in the garden and put it down to being too wet. I now grow my 'White Swan'in a pot in a frame.

As to the seedlings pricking them out has been a disaster in that I had ninety and all but ten died when I did this. They make very poor fragile roots at the seedling stage. If I get seed this year I will sow individually to avoid root disturbance

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

Tony wrote:

As to the seedlings pricking them out has been a disaster in that I had ninety and all but ten died when I did this. They make very poor fragile roots at the seedling stage. If I get seed this year I will sow individually to avoid root disturbance

Tony....that is good to know!! The 'White Swan' seeds you sent me are now germinating and so I will be extra careful when pricking them out!

Mark...If this were my plant I might dig the clump up and clean away the rotting parts to get a good look at what is going on, then replant in another spot.

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Last year I sowed seed of Anemonopsis macrophylla from my own declining plant (was rotting off), and had surprisingly good germination. Last year (2012) I never got around to planting out the seedlings, but I'm pleased to see how the young plants over-wintered and leafed out in the last week or so; I have a new bed ready to receive this treasure.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

If you use propagation domes and fluorescent lights after transplanting the seedlings, you might have higher survival rates. 

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

But mine survived just fine without any special apparatus; they're ready to plant out.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, how was the germinating rate? Seems you got a good rate or had a lot of seed ;)
I have just planted out seedlings from two different sources and have to more to go but these are later in growing. They all was sown and germinated last year but with a low rate so I don't bother separating them but plant in clumps.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Germination rate was very high; it was seed collected off my own plant and sown fresh.  Now I can try growing them on, in a couple different garden locations.  I do the same, planting out small clumps of seedlings.  By the way, the tiny seedlings of Gentiana purpurea from your seed, were planted out last autumn, and they look good now and starting to grow, thank you!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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