Androsace sarmentosa

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Kelaidis
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Joined: 2010-02-03
Androsace sarmentosa

Or whatever they're calling it now. I thought it would be fun to show off the big mat of this terrific Himalayan growing in Plantasia, the Chinese themed garden at Denver Botanic Gardens. I think most rock gardeners have pretty decent stands of this accommodating plant, of whatever name for the month it's saddled with.

If you haven't had success, may I suggest putting it in a woodland type garden with dappled shade: that's where this plant is. There are Digitalis behind it, and huge Arisaemas nearby, and lots of big Ligularia and Podophyllums not to far away. this has been growing here contentedly, mulched with pine needles, for years...One of the classic rock plants.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

When you say, "Or whatever they're calling it now", is this (attached) what you are referring to?
http://www.androsace.org.uk/sarmentosa.htm

I was/am very confused over the identities of "A. sarmentosa" I bought years ago... I gather, from finding this article just now, that they are likely A. studiosorum... ?  I guess I'll have to remember to look at the bracts at the base of the umbels in spring... but at least there is finally a clue!  :)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Here is what I purchased as A. sarmentosa var. watkinsii which according to Smith and Lowe is actually var. limprichtii...personally I am doubtful of the ID, but whatever it is, it is reliable in my area.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Androsace studiosorum: that's the current flavor of the month when it comes to names for this. I notice it hasn't caught on in alpine nursery catalogs by and large. Aa. sherrifii, watkinsii, primuloides, limprichtii...let's see how many more epithets we can scrounge up....suddenly the terribly apropos sarmentosa looks awful comfy. Harrumph!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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