Alpines September 2012

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

This is another fortuitous combination that works rather brilliantly - Cyclamen intaminatum and Artemisia schmidtiana 'Nana'. The cyclamen is seeding all over the raised bed and needs a place like this to show off its tiny intricately veined flowers. The artemisia is one of those plants that looks exceedingly sorry for itself over winter, but shines again the following year.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

After I showed the flower of Gentiana depressa, Lesley Cox in New Zealand described a plant she grew with over 100 flowers, and a picture of another flowering freely (see the SRGC Forum). So it's back to the drawing board for me! It must be the fact that it has not flowered at all in our garden which makes even one flower so exciting.

Sometimes you can enjoy just one flower more than a carpet of them! The beauty of the flower drowns in the mass.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim, your sand bed is impressive even just in leaf! You have probably told us elsewhere and I have forgotten, but how do you feed the plants?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Tim, your gardens are a constant inspiration... and source of plant envy!  ;D  With every posting, there is a new bunch of species I have to put on my "get" list.  It is very interesting and encouraging to see your young Gentiana depressa, and even more encouraging to see Lesley's extraordinary mature plant - so nice to see that it can be growable!

Nothing new here - Pyrethrum leontopodium is becoming woolier and woolier:

First blooms on Erigeron nematophyllus, from seed last year:

Orostachys iwarenge - it is so late-blooming that these inflorescences tend to get nipped in the bud (ha, a pun!  :rolleyes:) by frost:

Bumblebee in Agoseris glauca... its wingtips are worn...

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

As always, Tim- a lot of great textures and colours there! Love the Cyclamen coming through the Artemisia! That might be a combination worth emulating, with different species of course!

Lori, the Pyrethrum seems to have the right idea! I think the mild frosts we've had are a good thing for the plants- a couple years ago we had no cold at all through Sept, then suddenly -20C in the first week of Oct, and it was very hard on plants, even native trees were caught off guard, with leaves unchanged frozen in place! This year in spite of the lovely days, there's been enough cold to get them preparing for winter..

Good to see the Orostachys surviving for you, even if the flowers don't make it... I have a couple of cuttings received in August outside - they seem to have new tight little growths in the centres, so they seem to be readying for winter, we'll see if they are hardy enough- I kept one piece inside!
I have first time buds on a couple of Townsendia parryi planted out last fall.. wonder if those buds will open?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Several people have asked about feeding plants on the sand bed and so far I haven't done this though I am sure some would have benefited. The idea of using sand is to limit the vigour of the plants, so in general those things that don't do so well I shall probably try in a richer 'scree' (yet to be constructed!). Many plants I am sure steadily get their roots down into the soil below and then begin to grow more vigorously. There are a few things that have stood still for ages which I really should have given a local feeding just to get them rooting out into the sand. Few plants really give signs of nutrient deficiency, but a couple of douglasias look very sad for themselves and small phloxes haven't done so well - the sand is probably just too deep. My dream would be a combined sand and tufa bed - the latter gives so many opportunities with more choice plants.

To put this in perspective though, here are a couple of pictures of alpines at Blackthorn Nursery, grown just in shallow gravel over the ordinary soil, and at Capt. Peter Erskine's garden... if you could start over! (These two gardens are an incredible inspiration but really not many people grow alpines outside like this).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

A couple of interesting gardens, Tim! How deep would you say the shallow gravel is? In the new rock gardens I've made, they are basically built up with sod and soil, rocks used on the edges for stability, shape and look, then the upper and outer layers are soil with gravel in varying proportions- I've tried to keep some areas with more soil, some ridges and pockets of mostly gravel, and other areas with more humus added- theoretically to suit different plants. One of my intentions is that the raised aspect of the beds and the gravel will provide for dry crowns for the plants, but the soil inside the mounds will be available to those with deeper roots that don't want to really dry out... time will tell if it works! So far the things I planted last year are mostly happy, though I don't know that any of them are fussy anyway- certainly not the semps that are the main part of one bed..

In the second garden, is this cut into natural rock, or more of a built up wall? or?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim wrote:

To put this in perspective though, here are a couple of pictures of alpines at Blackthorn Nursery, grown just in shallow gravel over the ordinary soil, and at Capt. Peter Erskine's garden... if you could start over! (These two gardens are an incredible inspiration but really not many people grow alpines outside like this).

. . . . .if I had space!

Thanks for the info regarding feeding. It is more or less what I assumed - but it is sand and sand you know. Some kinds are more nutrient rich than others and I believe some plants are more craving than others too!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Everyone's plants are just awesome!  I especially like the Teucrium aroanum and Pyrethrum leontopodium.  How exciting to have such beauties in the garden!

After seen Orostachys iwarenge again in Lori's and Michael's gardens, I am even more suspect of the identity of a seedling of same grown from the NARGS seed ex this year.  And the bugger even decided to flower the first season!  Any suggestions?

8 August 2012

24 August 2012

23 September 2012

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

After seen Orostachys iwarenge again in Lori's and Michael's gardens, I am even more suspect of the identity of a seedling of same grown from the NARGS seed ex this year.  And the bugger even decided to flower the first season!  Any suggestions?
[attachthumb=3]

I dunno... looks like Orostachys iwarenge to me... could maybe use more light.  Some of the ones I grew last year bloomed in the first season too.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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