Alpines September 2012

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Viewed at full magnification, it's a giant among the dwarf leaves.  The colors are so distinct, and no wonder people love gentians!  :o

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It's a beauty to be sure!  And what a tubby little flower!

Not much happening here...
An update on Lupinus aridus ssp ashlandensis:
 

The colour of Scutellaria hypericifolia seems especially intense these days:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

After I showed the flower of Gentiana depressa, Lesley Cox in New Zealand described a plant she grew with over 100 flowers, and a picture of another flowering freely (see the SRGC Forum). So it's back to the drawing board for me! It must be the fact that it has not flowered at all in our garden which makes even one flower so exciting.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Tim; I think you do well just to have G. depressa. Rick Lupp (Mt. Tahoma Nursery) offered it years ago, the only time I've seen it offered in the US. I was unable to keep it going. Your post offers hope that it is possible and worth trying again!

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Indeed.  I never have regrets showing my obviously "less than stellar" plant forays, like all those tiny frit bulbs  :rolleyes:.  It's all a learning process that may or may not happen.  I wish these forums' members would volunteer more cultural information, rather than just pretty pictures.  (Although, I do love the pretty pictures!)  In my view, NARGS is a little better at this than the SRGC.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Steve Newall
Steve Newall's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

Don't go back to the drawing board Tim . You are doing a brilliant job and I enjoy seeing what you grow

Balclutha , New Zealand

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Tim, to put all this in perspective, you probably have one of the best examples of G. depressa in England at the moment.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

RickR wrote:

I wish these forums' members would volunteer more cultural information, rather than just pretty pictures.

It is said that a picture can be worth a thousand words!

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Hmm.. kind of a blue theme in these late summer ( I was going to say fall, but I guess for most of you it's still summer!) flowers!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I do agree with Rick - that steady detail of how you go about making a bed and planting it does make you focus more closely on how you are growing the plants. I particularly like it when plants begin to seed naturally and intermingle because you begin to really get what goes on in Nature, even if it is only on a tiny scale. Edraianthus pumilio has been a real star seeding around on the sand bed (and could almost be mistaken for Eritrichium howardii in autumn plumage!). The success of this sand bed is encouraging us to develop other, and different, areas for growing alpines, and the prospect of removing an ugly leyland conifer hedge on the shady side of the garden which would open up a place for a different range of plants.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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