Alpines September 2012

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Alpines September 2012

A couple of lupins bought from Beaver Creek and planted this year - Lupinus wyethii (with this year's seedling Salvia pachyphylla in the background - if it survives and thrives, it may one day outgrow its spot... I don't think I'll worry about that just yet ;)) and Lupinus aridus ssp. ashlandensis, which has put up a couple of flower buds:

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Those are extremely moreish plants Lori! I must try and emulate that coarse tufa scree. I have a few lupin species germinating and the bigger species like albifrons have made magnificent, if short lived, specimens in the garden.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Cute little Lupines! I wonder if the second will get a chance to mature its flowers?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I like these little Lupines more than the huge Russel hybrids often grown in gardens here!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Now starting to open, Lupinus aridus ssp. ashlandensis, bought from Beaver Creek this spring:
 

Attractive foliage on Goniolimon cf. speciosa, from seed last year (Holubec seed from China, Karlik Shan, Xijiang):

Erigeron nematophyllus, from seed last year, in bud now:

This year's seedlings of Astragalus loanus... one doing OK so far, the other not so well... very difficult to grow, according to Stephanie's article in the fall, 2011 RGQ, so this may well be the best look I get at them!

Seed heads of Agoseris glauca:

Two of this year's seedlings of Dracocephalum multicaule (seed from Pavelka:  "2400m, Aras Dag, Turkey; dense cushions, erect leafy stems, 10-15cm, many white to pale yellow flws, stoney slopes").  One is a very attractive plant though with smaller flowers than the other, less dense, but larger-flowered one.
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, many gems but the lupin is the diamond - so far ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I got that Lupinus from Beaver Creek as well....didn't even live long enough to plant out!  It seems to detest wet.

Some current bloomers:

Delphinium species (who knows which one!), Epilobium fleischeri, Erica cinerea 'Atropurpurea' and Gentiana asclepiadea

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Some others: Salvia przewalskii (just starting), Gentiana loderi, G. veitchiorum and an out-of-season bloom on Pulsatilla turczaninovii.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nice, Todd!
Here the fall rain has started and it is completely soaked everywhere :(

No flowers but here are some nice Saxes on my roof. Hope they flower next spring!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Impressive saxes Trond!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

This is a real little treasure flowering for the first time, though it has grown vegetatively quite happily for several years, Gentiana depressa. Only one flower but somehow it commands attention. I am quite surprised this grows with us at all in our dry garden and expect I will now be told that it makes huge flowering mats all over Scottish gardens! This belongs to the same section as the rather legendary G. urnula, all nicely described and drawn in Josef Halda's monograph on Gentiana. I think I may be lucky to grow any more of them!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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