Alpines in May

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Hatchett
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-06

Well May is almost over, you would not know it by looking at all the snow in the hills(it snowed on the valley floor on Saturday) and the freezing temps at night... such is life in Idaho. I am so glad to be back from my trip to Asia with only a case of stomach crud. Of course things in the gardens have changed a bit though I think the continuing cold temps are slowing things down. I did manage to take some pictures this afternoon and that will be it for May pictures. Here is a link:
http://ImageEvent.com/teita/rockgardenmay252010
I would like to comment that this is a great forum, i can not image the work that must have gone into it.
jim

Jim Hatchett
Eagle, Idaho Zone 3?
Elevation  2600', Annual precipitation 11" avg.

Against boredom even the gods struggle in vain"
Friedrich Nietzsche

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Lovely images Jim.....despite snow in the hills, yours plants are still way ahead of mine.  Our nights are only the upper 30's but our days are struggling to reach the 50's.  Your days must be warmer I guess.  Suffice to say, things may be late in Idaho, but they are even later in Newfoundland!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hatchett wrote:

I did manage to take some pictures this afternoon and that will be it for May pictures. Here is a link:
http://ImageEvent.com/teita/rockgardenmay252010
jim

Jim, I viewed this gallery from your Alpine-L link, some great plants there... really liked Aster scopulorum, and that form of Penstemon davidsonii, while paler flowered than some I've seen, certainly makes up for it with huge flowers compared to the tiny leaves.  Had me thinking of Penstemons... here's one from my past, one of the few that I still have with me, flowering better than in many years, Penstemon 'Grape Tart', a Dasanthera hybrid; the flowers look two-toned as they are deep purplish color in bud, opening a shde or two lighter.  The plant growing through it is Marshallia grandiflora.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

My dasyanthera penstemon are just starting to bud.

Valeriana arizonica is at its peak...tiny blooms but great fragrance.  My Cortusa sacchalinensis is just opening...at least that what the seeds were labeled as...looks like C. matthioli to me!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Todd wrote:

My dasyanthera penstemon are just starting to bud.

Valeriana arizonica is at its peak...tiny blooms but great fragrance.  My Cortusa sacchalinensis is just opening...at least that what the seeds were labeled as...looks like C. matthioli to me!

Todd, the Cortusa is a stunner... whether it is matthioli or sachalinensis, whatever it is, the leaves and flower presentation are delightful.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have also tried different Cortusa species and found them all to be very similar to matthioli if not the same (wrong labels or just subtle differences?)
That Valeriana arizonica looks interesting! The valerians I am acquainted with are totally different! (V. officinalis and lookalikes).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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