Alpines in July

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Alpines in July

Here is Bolanthus cherlerioides, from seed in 2010, now looking significantly more floriferous than in its youth, with Potentilla divina in the foreground:

Update on Gonioiimon cf. speciosa (seed collected by Holubec  in China, Karlik Shan, Xijiang, and started in 2011):

Another update on Salvia aff. caespitosa/S. quezelii? - very large flowers, relative to the plant size:

N.B.  I've been informed that this is actually Salvia blepharochleana, a rare Turkish endemic and a protected species.

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Cyananthus macrocalyx:

First flowers on Sideritis phlomoides, started from seed in 2011; seed collected by M. Pavelka at 2000m, Dedegol,Turkey:

  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Your tufa bed is very exciting and inspiring, Lori. With all those gems!

The Goniolimon is an excellent plant! It reminds me of Limonium vulgare which grows not far from our summer house (the only known locality in Norway). But it flowers later in the summer. (Pictures from a previous year.)

I am inspired to start my own version of a tufa bed but my attempt this spring was delayed due to the frozen soil and very late thawing.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Superb, Lori ... rare and wonderful plants.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks, Cliff and Trond! 

Limonium vulgare looks very rock garden-worthy... does it stay small like that, Trond?

Artemisia caucasica soon to flower... very similar to our Artemisia frigida, though probably more compact; seeds from M. Pavelka, collected at 1700m, mountain steppes, Ala Dag, Turkey; started in 2012:

Rheum delavayi, 9cm across; started from seed in 2012; seeds collected by Holubec in 2008 in China, Beima Shan, Yunnan, 4800m, slate scree:

Scutellaria hypericifolia - the camera is not getting the richness of the blue very well:

  

Last year's seedlings of Dracocephalum multicaule are starting to bloom:

Saponaria lutea:

Two plants of Silene saxifraga, the second with slightly smaller flowers:

  

Delphinium beesianum:

Remember how I said a while back  that it seemed Carduncellus pinnatus took many years to develop the nicely radial, very dissected blooming rosettes?   Well, this offset is many years old, but has not taken on the nice radial form yet is blooming.... so live and learn, I dunno.  The original "perfect" blooming rosette was dead this spring, after many years.  I wonder if the form of this rosette will improve with time?

Phyteuma charmellii:

Sideritis alpina; this plant has a quiet charm, IMO:

I know it would be happier in better soil with more regular moisture but Silene alpestris manages to survive in no-man's-land out along the sidewalk:

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

So sorry to hear your Carduncellus pinnatus died.  I think it's a wonderful plant.  What was the germination rate like, if you can remember?

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It didn't die completely - sorry to be unclear.  The plant persists from 2 or 3 offsets it produced, one of which is now blooming.  Unfortunately the offsets don't have (yet?) the nice symmetry of the original rosette (which did die off after many years).  I have two plants, both of which have produced offsets.  I haven't had any luck at germinating seed from it.  I tried fresh seed... Don't remember whether I also tried dry-stored.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I never realized that Carduncellus was so tiny!  In your last pic with the sempervivums, is that the normal size? 

 

Gosh, then the pics you posted in past years that I blew up to look closely at plant parts were incredibly detailed!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The larger rosettes I posted previously were about 6" -8" across.  The one shown is only about 4".

Here's a nice furry one, Marrubium lutescens; from seed in 2012; seed collected by M. Pavelka from 2000m, Sultan Dag, Turkey;

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori S. wrote:

Limonium vulgare looks very rock garden-worthy... does it stay small like that, Trond?

I don't think it is the easiest garden plant although it is quite showy - it needs moist soil (it often grows in wet, muddy soil at the seaside) and it spreads by runners.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Ajuga lupulina; Scutellaria alpina; Delphinium beesianum; Calylophus serrulatus starting to bloom; 

       

Gentiana siphonantha - my other specimen in bloom; rock garden view - Acantholimon kotschyi ssp. laxispicatum will be blooming very heavily in a while; Monardella odoratissima var. odoratissima;  Arenaria hookeri ssp. desertorum:

       

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Scutellaria tournefortii; Asyneuma sp.? [- Correction: I think this is Campanula fenestrellata] and Edraianthus sp. - I wasn't too disciplined with my plant records last year!;  

    

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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