Allium 2011

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Mark, do you have theese onions ;)
http://yuzawa-engei.net/11English/02Allium/Allium_page.html

I do!  Trond, an excellent nursery link (they have seed too) of many desirable plants.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I love the autumn alliums, and I'm happy to have found plants listed as Allium thunbergii alba at a local nursery this late summer, but in fact since it is such a small grower (about 3-4" tall, 7.5-10 cm)) and fewer-flowered than most thunbergii forms, maybe this is a white form of Allium virgunculae instead.  After drenching rains for several days, the flowers look perfect today.

View of Allium "thunbergii" or virgulculae alba with Saxifraga fortunei blooming in the background:

Two closeup views showing the perky pure white flower clusters:

Still waiting for the tiny Allium virgunculae to open its flowers, now still in tight bud, with flower stems at about 2" (5 cm) tall.

A reliable old planting of Allium thunbergii 'Ozawa' planted at the base of a Magnolia tree.

Two views of a tall form of Allium thunbergii sent to me by a friend last year.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Those little guys are so sweet!

You lucked out, Mark!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A miscellany of Alliums to post.

The issue of harvesting seed on the late blooming alliums comes up sometimes. Some are starting to set seed pods, and depending on the year and the weather, it is sometimes possible to get some seed. In this photo we see some developing pods on Allium aff. thunbergii (probably A. sacculiferum) collected by Dan Hinkley.  If the pods are left on to mature, it is likely they'll succumb to soaking rain and snow, so they can be picked in the green and allowed to dry out inside to get some viable seed.

The very small form of Allium virgunculae that I showed in bud earlier finally opened its flowers, this shot taken Oct. 25, 2011... a tiny delight.

Allium thunbergii 'Ozawa' and white Allium thunbergii alba still going strong.

A seedling grown from Allium thunbergii 'Ozawa' has for the last 4-5 years proved to be a rather tall robust form of A. thunbergii.  This year it is flowering later than normal, still just mostly in bud with a few first florets opening.

Below... a seed-grown plant from Jim Jones' variegated form of Allium nutans shows variable amounts of variegation, some leaves nearly totally variegated, other leaves partially variegated, and many leaves all green.  The flowers are "uggo" (ugly) but I'm happy to have at least one of the seedlings grow on and show some level of strong variegation.

Last photo, I was sent bulbs from the Netherlands of an Allium simply called Allium 'Cameleon' (I am told, the European spelling of the word leaves out the "h" or "chameleon" as we spell it in the US.  This plant was reputedly an American species, but is actually a Mediterranean species; mostly likely A. trifoliatum of A. longanum.  The fact the foliage emerges in the fall and remains through the winter (and the broad hairy-ciliate edged leaves) 100% rule this out as an American species; it is most certainly one of the two species I mentioned.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

Great pictures, Mark. I particularly liked the virgunculae...

I was in Kew Gardens in London on 1st October, a day when record temperatures for the time of year were being recorded. It was over 30C that day. In the alpine house there were a couple of thunbergiis which were both still in bud. The first is "Ozoke", the other with no cultivar name. Both were pot grown:

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Stephen, I like the really grassy clump-forming one in the second photo, looks more like a virgunculae variety.  I used to have such a form, would like to rebuild my collection of these sweet little fall bloomers.  Need to refresh my memory of the recent revised taxonomy on the thunbergii-virgulculae clan (that I had posted on SRGC), here are some links:

Allium virgunculae var. kiiense, var. koshikiense (published 2009), var. yakushimense (published 1998), and the species pseudojaponicum, austrokyushuense, jump into the fray with thunbergii as well.

http://www.srgc.org.uk/forum/index.php?topic=5766.msg170443#msg170443

http://www.srgc.org.uk/forum/index.php?topic=5766.msg169576#msg169576

Map of Allium virgunculae varieties:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/forum/index.php?topic=5766.msg169700#msg169700 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Allium thunbergii 'Ozawas' is finally in best bloom now.

         

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Allium thunbergii 'Ozawas' is finally in best bloom now.

Very nice Rick.  In your photos, the pedicels look dark charcoal color instead of green, which is particularly attractive!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Very nice Rick.  In your photos, the pedicels look dark charcoal color instead of green, which is particularly attractive!

A trait that occurs only with the onset of cold (freezing?) weather. But the stems are similarly colored, too.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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