Allium 2011

91 posts / 0 new
Last post
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Stephenb wrote:

Just like to say that that I really enjoyed your NARGS article, Mark ....bedtime reading the last few nights! Particularly like Green Eyes and Wall of Pink....just wish they were available over here... Same applies to Curly Mauve (above). Victorialis is also a favourite and I'll post something about that one soon myself. If you ever get seed off that variegated nutans, would love to try it... :)  

Here's one of my spring favourites, Asian Allium carolinianum photographed a couple of days ago:

Catching up here :-\

Thanks for your comments Stephen.  I need to get Green Eyes, Wall of Pink, and a few others into the hands of nurserymen, to start making these available.  Love the look of emerging shoots of A. carolinianum, nice picture, and an excellent clump of this beautiful species.  I used to grow about 5-6 forms of this; I'm down to one form that persists and flowers about 1 out of every 3 years, and it never increases.  Among some of the forms that I lost, where much easier and better growers, although that didn't help them when I allowed my garden to go wild with weeds for too many years when my two daughters were young and lack of time got the better of me. 

Seed of Curly Mauve will yield plants that are variably curly, most not as prostrate as the original, but some interesting curly-whirly plants should result... I'll be sure to collect seed this year.

I have a particularly robust form of Allium hymenorrhizum (closely allied to A. carolinianum) that has similar thick ruddy red shoots in spring.  Here are two views of emerging shoots from some years back, the plant is still with me and a good grower, although it makes very little seed, none in some years.

Allium hymenorrhizum robust form, at latter leaf growth, showing mildly falcate leaves, which is somewhet unusual for the species:

And a view of the emerging shoots on my Allium carolinianum back in 2001.  In the 10 years since, it has not increased, and is still just two shoots :rolleyes:  In 2009, it was one of the rare years where it condescended to flower.  I have seen photos of spectacular forms of this species, my plant is not among them.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Weiser wrote:

Mark
How many species of allium do you grow? The list seems endless.
I'll have to think twice, before asking how many varieties and hybrids there are.

John, I used to grow approximately 130 species + many forms of certain species.  That count has paired back quite a bit through the years, although offset by a large increase in hybrids, so there are still lots of alliums here to pique my interest.  Sowing seed of some of the Iranian and Central Asian species starting a couple years back, and with many accessions from Kazakhstan last year (most have germinated), the numbers will hopefully increase, although it's a slow proposition with many of them, requiring 5-6 or more years from seed.  

For example, here is a photo (left) of some seedlings of A. shelkovnikovi, one of those dwarf C. Asian species with a ball of bloom just above wide leaves.  I sow my seed outside directly in the garden, marked with minimum of two labels.  In this view, you can see a couple fresh seedlings that just emerged a couple weeks ago, and a couple 2-year seedlings where the young immature leaves are starting to take on the gray curled leaf characteristics.  This was seed from Kurt Vickery.  The center photo shows a similar situation, with in-situ seedlings of Allium aff. elburzense (K.Vickery again), lots of fresh germination this year (2nd year germination) and a couple of silvery 2-year leaf sprouts fro germination last year.

Photo on the right shows fresh germination from Allium sp. coll. N. Sivas, Turkey, from NARGS Seed Exchange 2008-2009, which has only just germinated.  Folks, don't give up on those old seed sowings, you never know, one can still get good germination after 2 years!  Hooray!

Will catch up with other posts later.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

...and I learned (in school?) that onion seed (Allium cepa) lost its viability rather quickly, that in practical terms it's not worth sowing seed more than a year old.  Is this only for the vegetable onion?  Only for dry seed?  Maybe moist storage prolongs viability?  Or maybe I'm just . . . . wrong?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

...and I learned (in school?) that onion seed (Allium cepa) lost its viability rather quickly, that in practical terms it's not worth sowing seed more than a year old.  Is this only for the vegetable onion?  Only for dry seed?  Maybe moist storage prolongs viability?  Or maybe I'm just . . . . wrong?

I have no experience with A. cepa seed, but I can vouch for relatively long viability of Allium seed for several years, particularly those species with larger thick seed, or round pellet-like seed, versus those with flatter flake-like seed.  I find that 2nd year germination is quite common on certain types of Alliums species, such as those in the Melanocrommyum section (a la Allium giganteum types).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

My experience is that seed of Allium cepa and fistulosum vegetable cultivars remains viable for 2-3 years, longer than the oft-quoted 1 year, at least under my storage conditions (cool cellar - 2-3C in winter and maybe up to 15C in summer).
 

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

Here's my carolinianum in flower last summer! However, I've seen a significantly larger, more vigorous plant in the botanical gardens in Tromsø in Northern Norway, it seems to like cool conditions.

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

Like the Allium hymenorrhizum pictures. I have  plants from 2 or 3 sources and none look at all like carolinianum. I have pictures of this species in both the Oxford and Copenhagen Botanical Gardens and I see that both look wrong!

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

McDonough wrote:

A. victorialis - closeup views showing the burlap-like reticulated bulb coats; the bulbs sitting at and above the soil level.
[attachthumb=2] [attachthumb=3]

Mark - I notice that all of your victorialis seem to have green rather than red bases. Is that correct? All of mine have red bases apart from Cantabria (that includes the Norwegian material, plants from the Kola Peninsular (NW Russia) and Asia (received as A. ochotense and ssp platyphyllum). Do you know if you find both green and red forms in the same populations?

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

two forms of
Allium akaka from Eastern Turkey

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Some Alliums flowering here now:

Allium akaka
Allium litvinovii
Allium nevskianum
Allium platycaule

and an Allium which was hiding in the packet of A. platycaule; which it clearly is not! Maybe A. akaka??

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Pages

Log in or register to post comments